Issue

Global Health: HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean

The Caribbean conjures up visions of sun, sand, and tourism to most, but with HIV rates second only to those of sub-Saharan Africa, these islands face a complex and disturbing set of circumstances in their fight against the AIDS epidemic.

Poor infrastructure, low-resources, and endemic poverty are commonalities shared by most of these island nations, while diverse histories, languages and cultures make each country's plight unique.

Through articles, photography and videos, as well as original poetry and music, HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean underscores both obstacles and successes. Reporting from Haiti, before and after the earthquake, highlights initial progress and devastating setbacks. In the Dominican Republic, Haitian immigrants living in a stateless limbo face discrimination and hostility, keeping health care for AIDS patients out of reach. And in Jamaica, stigma, homophobia, and anti-gay laws force the epidemic underground with disastrous results.

Reporting from Pulitzer Center journalists paints a regional portrait of the epidemic, where culture and religion clash with the realities of homosexuality and commercial sex; and where the wealthiest and the poorest countries in the hemisphere meet in a tangled web of tourism, aid donations, domestic policy, and external expertise.

 

The Pulitzer Center's reporting on HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean was made possible with support from the MAC AIDS Fund.

Global Health: HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean

Job

This is a home,
this is a shelter,
these walls, shaken,
the lines of jagged
cracks, the split
at the ceiling
that lets in light
and rain

Boy in Blue

The words cluster behind your teeth;
close in, the smooth patina, deep brown,
of your face is alight with the effort:
you, boy, carrying the weight
of an old man

Storm

From here the mountains around
Port-au-Prince are green; too
far to see the denuded hillside,
too far to see the brown wounds

Bebe's Wish

When you leave from here, head down
Canape Vert to your cooling hotel room,
to the breadfruit casserole and barbecue
chicken, to the closed in peace of your
life

Mother of Mothers

The faces of mothers of mothers,
their cheekbones gleaming against
taut skins; their eyes glazed
with the scarring of so much loss.

Transforming journalism: HOPE & Glass Closet

Award-winning multimedia reporting projects on HIV/AIDS that combine print reporting, poetry, photography, video, radio, music and an open dialogue to engage the broadest possible audience.

Tuesday, September 22
12:00-2:00 pm: Panel discussion and screening
Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism
Third Floor Lecture Hall

Panelists:
Pulitzer Center Executive Director Jon Sawyer
HOPE Special Correspondent/Poet: Kwame Dawes
Glass Closet Filmmaker: Micah Fink
WorldFocus Producer: Lisa Biagiotti