Issue

Global Health: HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean

The Caribbean conjures up visions of sun, sand, and tourism to most, but with HIV rates second only to those of sub-Saharan Africa, these islands face a complex and disturbing set of circumstances in their fight against the AIDS epidemic.

Poor infrastructure, low-resources, and endemic poverty are commonalities shared by most of these island nations, while diverse histories, languages and cultures make each country's plight unique.

Through articles, photography and videos, as well as original poetry and music, HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean underscores both obstacles and successes. Reporting from Haiti, before and after the earthquake, highlights initial progress and devastating setbacks. In the Dominican Republic, Haitian immigrants living in a stateless limbo face discrimination and hostility, keeping health care for AIDS patients out of reach. And in Jamaica, stigma, homophobia, and anti-gay laws force the epidemic underground with disastrous results.

Reporting from Pulitzer Center journalists paints a regional portrait of the epidemic, where culture and religion clash with the realities of homosexuality and commercial sex; and where the wealthiest and the poorest countries in the hemisphere meet in a tangled web of tourism, aid donations, domestic policy, and external expertise.

 

The Pulitzer Center's reporting on HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean was made possible with support from the MAC AIDS Fund.

Global Health: HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean

Dominican Citizenships Put into Doubt

A change to the Dominican Republic's Constitution, which denies citizenship to children born to undocumented residents, has put into doubt the legal status of people of Haitian descent.

Carrefour

Political turmoil continues following Haiti's election, on the heels of a cholera outbreak and ongoing damage and displacement from January's earthquake.

Fighting Back

A year after Haiti's capital was destroyed by an earthquake, violence and rape haunt the lives of vulnerable women and children living in makeshift settlements. But a handful of Haitians have mobilized to fight for protection and justice for their sisters.

Pastor Sainton During the Riots

In the midst of riots and cholera outbreak, Pastor Joel Sainton continues to minister to Haitians with HIV/AIDS.

Bebe the Mother

A woman relies on sex work to make ends meet, struggling to support herself and her children following Haiti's earthquake.

Ganthier

I thought, he said of the wife
who lasted six months, before
the news of this treachery of the
blood, before he lay on his back
 

Conversations with alumnus Kwame Dawes

Annie Paul, The Pelican

Just back from writing poems in India, internationally acclaimed poet and UWI alumnus Kwame Dawes sat down with Annie Paul for an engaging discussion about his life, his alma mater's role in shaping him as an artist and the Emmy Award-winning LiveHopeLove project.

HOPE featured on Nieman Storyboard

Jacqueline Marino

Nieman Storyboard

Writing is part of the digital story: examples of powerful multimedia presentations that incorporate (not just link to) good nonfiction writing.

"Live Hope Love" Wins Gracie Award for Outstanding Radio Documentary

Produced by Stephanie Guyer-Stevens and Jack Chance of Outer Voices, and Nathalie Applewhite of the Pulitzer Center, the radio documentary, "LiveHopeLove: HIV/AIDS in Jamaica" is part of Hope: Living and Loving with HIV in Jamaica, the Pulitzer Center's award-winning multimedia reporting project that chronicles poet and writer Kwame Dawes' travels to Jamaica, where he explores the experiences of people living with HIV/AIDS and examines the ways in which the disease shapes their lives.

"House Call in Hell" cited in Baptist Press article

By Baptist Press Staff

A Baptist Press article describing prison conditions in Haiti highlights Pulitzer Center reporting on Haiti's National Penitentiary by Antigone Barton and Steve Sapienza:

The men, by contrast, are imprisoned in Haiti's notorious National Penitentiary, a facility located just a few blocks from the country's National Palace in central Port-au-Prince that was known for squalid conditions before it was largely destroyed by the Jan. 12 quake.

LiveHopeLove.com featured in SubmarineChannel's top 10 web documentaries

"Hope: Living and Loving with HIV in Jamaica" is featured in a list of the top 10 web documentaries according to SubmarineChannel, a visual culture platform in Amsterdam. SubmarineChannel calls "Hope" a "beautifully-designed reporting project by poet and writer Kwame Dawes sharing testimonies from Jamaican HIV victims, with cross-media contributions pulled together in a dramatically filmic visual style."