Issue

Global Health: HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean

The Caribbean conjures up visions of sun, sand, and tourism to most, but with HIV rates second only to those of sub-Saharan Africa, these islands face a complex and disturbing set of circumstances in their fight against the AIDS epidemic.

Poor infrastructure, low-resources, and endemic poverty are commonalities shared by most of these island nations, while diverse histories, languages and cultures make each country's plight unique.

Through articles, photography and videos, as well as original poetry and music, HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean underscores both obstacles and successes. Reporting from Haiti, before and after the earthquake, highlights initial progress and devastating setbacks. In the Dominican Republic, Haitian immigrants living in a stateless limbo face discrimination and hostility, keeping health care for AIDS patients out of reach. And in Jamaica, stigma, homophobia, and anti-gay laws force the epidemic underground with disastrous results.

Reporting from Pulitzer Center journalists paints a regional portrait of the epidemic, where culture and religion clash with the realities of homosexuality and commercial sex; and where the wealthiest and the poorest countries in the hemisphere meet in a tangled web of tourism, aid donations, domestic policy, and external expertise.

 

The Pulitzer Center's reporting on HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean was made possible with support from the MAC AIDS Fund.

Global Health: HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean

Stories of Rebuilding

GoTriad.com features "Voices of Haiti," a multi-media presentation with poems by Kwame Dawes, photographs by Andre Lambertson, and music by composer Kevin Simmonds and soprano Valetta Brinson.

Poet Kwame Dawes Visits Banneker High School

On Friday, December 17, Kwame Dawes, a poet, professor, and Pulitzer Center grantee, visited Benjamin Banneker Academic High School in Washington D.C.. During the visit, Dawes shared his latest project, "Voices from Haiti," an exploration of Haiti one year after the devastating January 2010 earthquake.

Haiti, After the Quake

When high school seniors from the School Without Walls in Washington, DC were asked what they've heard lately about Haiti by visiting Pulitzer Center journalists, they responded, "not much." Almost 10 months after the earthquake, media attention on Haiti has faded. The country's struggles have not.