Issue

Global Health: HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean

The Caribbean conjures up visions of sun, sand, and tourism to most, but with HIV rates second only to those of sub-Saharan Africa, these islands face a complex and disturbing set of circumstances in their fight against the AIDS epidemic.

Poor infrastructure, low-resources, and endemic poverty are commonalities shared by most of these island nations, while diverse histories, languages and cultures make each country's plight unique.

Through articles, photography and videos, as well as original poetry and music, HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean underscores both obstacles and successes. Reporting from Haiti, before and after the earthquake, highlights initial progress and devastating setbacks. In the Dominican Republic, Haitian immigrants living in a stateless limbo face discrimination and hostility, keeping health care for AIDS patients out of reach. And in Jamaica, stigma, homophobia, and anti-gay laws force the epidemic underground with disastrous results.

Reporting from Pulitzer Center journalists paints a regional portrait of the epidemic, where culture and religion clash with the realities of homosexuality and commercial sex; and where the wealthiest and the poorest countries in the hemisphere meet in a tangled web of tourism, aid donations, domestic policy, and external expertise.

 

The Pulitzer Center's reporting on HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean was made possible with support from the MAC AIDS Fund.

Global Health: HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean

"Voices of Haiti" iBook on iTunes!

"Voices of Haiti," the second in the Pulitzer Center's series of iBooks on issues that matter, is now available. Visit the iTunes store to download a free sample or purchase the full book.

Haiti: Partners In Health

Partners In Health has been an important organization in post-earthquake Haiti—a key to its success is listening to what the communities want, rather than telling them what they need.

Haiti: Prostitution and Rape Increase after Quake

It is not as if teenage prostitution didn’t exist in Haiti before the January 2010 earthquake that left 1.5 million displaced, tens of thousands of them living in haphazardly-placed tents in scattered through the capital, Port-au-Prince. But in the months since, the number of girls, some as young as 8, who have been forced to have sex in order to survive has drastically increased. Not surprisingly, the number of rapes has also gone up.

Stranded: The Stateless Haitians

Up to a million Haitians, and descendants of Haitians, are being affected by a new law about citizenship in the Dominican Republic. Many could face deportation, despite being born in the country.

Haiti's Horrendous Teenage Prostitution Problem

Thousands of Haitians remain in camps in Port-au-Prince after a massive earthquake hit last year. Now, 16 months after the disaster, young girls are being forced to have sex in order to survive.