Issue

Global Health: HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean

The Caribbean conjures up visions of sun, sand, and tourism to most, but with HIV rates second only to those of sub-Saharan Africa, these islands face a complex and disturbing set of circumstances in their fight against the AIDS epidemic.

Poor infrastructure, low-resources, and endemic poverty are commonalities shared by most of these island nations, while diverse histories, languages and cultures make each country's plight unique.

Through articles, photography and videos, as well as original poetry and music, HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean underscores both obstacles and successes. Reporting from Haiti, before and after the earthquake, highlights initial progress and devastating setbacks. In the Dominican Republic, Haitian immigrants living in a stateless limbo face discrimination and hostility, keeping health care for AIDS patients out of reach. And in Jamaica, stigma, homophobia, and anti-gay laws force the epidemic underground with disastrous results.

Reporting from Pulitzer Center journalists paints a regional portrait of the epidemic, where culture and religion clash with the realities of homosexuality and commercial sex; and where the wealthiest and the poorest countries in the hemisphere meet in a tangled web of tourism, aid donations, domestic policy, and external expertise.

 

The Pulitzer Center's reporting on HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean was made possible with support from the MAC AIDS Fund.

Global Health: HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean

Take Five: Jon Sawyer, the Pulitzer Center's executive director, talks about new tools of journalism

Livehopelove.com feels like a plane ticket, a passport, something that helps you get from here to there. The website, a reporting project on HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting , features interviews, music, photos and poems.

Together, the story told is about living and dying with HIV/AIDS in Jamaica.

"Most of my friends are dying -- the thing is, they know it, and the others are busy nursing the dying: God's cruel edits."

"Grand: The Piece Makes a Wonderful Whole," Wisteria and HOPE Review in the Winston-Salem Journal

Poet Kwame Dawes provided the words for HOPE & Wisteria, two back-to-back performance pieces that explore different aspects of the black experience. But his contribution, vital as it is, is only one part of the puzzle. Each production is a multimedia piece using music, images and Dawes' poetry.

The musicians and singers, performing alongside Dawes on stage, contribute immensely to the power of the production, as do the photographers whose work is projected on a large screen behind the performers.

HIV/AIDS in Jamaica: A Poet Responds

In an interview on The Root, poet Kwame Dawes discusses his role and shares his experience in creating the multimedia project "Hope: Living and Loving with HIV in Jamaica," commissioned by the Pulitzer Center to document the human face of HIV in Jamaica, the country of Kwame's youth.

Learn more about the Emmy-winning LiveHopeLove.com

Wisteria & HOPE featured in YES! Weekly

Although it's called the Black Theatre Festival, this biennial gathering of African-American artists draws creative people from all over the nation working in a variety of mediums. Kwame Dawes, the poet in residence at the University of South Carolina, will present his multimedia productions titled Wisteria and Hope during the festival. [For complete performance listings, see page 20.] Wisteria and Hope are two separate pieces performed back to back.

Antigone Barton presents on HIV/AIDS at Indiana University, March 29-30

"Heroes of HIV: HIV in the Caribbean" reporter Antigone Barton will participate in the "Mobilizing and Engaging Communities for Global Health" Conference at Indiana University during March 29-30.

The conference, which is hosted by Americans for Informed Democracy, seeks to raise awareness amongst the younger population about international health issues such as AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria as well as inspire students to strive for policy solutions.

HIV-AIDS in the Caribbean: Facing the Epidemic Just Off US Shores

This Saturday, December 1, is World AIDS Day, a moment each year for special focus on the epidemic. Two hours away from American shores people face this epidemic daily. The Dominican Republic and Haiti boast the highest rates in this hemisphere of the virus that leads to AIDS. And it is a story that has been overlooked in the American mainstream media.