Issue

Global Health: Outbreaks and Epidemics

Some agents, like the Ebola virus, ravage nations without warning or mercy. They capture the world’s attention—and aid. We can’t look away.

Other agents creep quietly from host to host, devastating communities for decades: One third of the world’s population is infected with tuberculosis, but its latency allows drug-resistant strains to rise.

Outbreaks and Epidemics digs into both types of communicable illness—the sudden and the ceaseless. It explores cholera’s sweep through Haiti following the earthquake, and how the lack of water and sanitation infrastructure turned a treatable illness into a second (third, and fourth) round of devastation. This gateway also exposes the economic grip malaria still holds on African countries, still prone to epidemics of bedridden students and workers.

Pulitzer Center journalists trace HIV/AIDS from its origin to its current status, unearthing clues to developing a successful vaccine. They investigate the epidemic of stigma, examining how religion and culture contribute to homophobia and the spread of the virus.

By telling the stories of patients, caregivers, and scientists, our reporters are drawing outbreak comparisons and providing lessons for prevention. They are also taking on the challenge of communicating technical information to the lay ear, and ultimately filling the gap between the scientific and public understanding of germs.

Global Health: Outbreaks and Epidemics

Improving India's Plumbing

Ann Schraufnagel, our Global Health Reporting fellow from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, discusses India's urgent need to fix its plumbing.

After Nepal Quakes, Worries in the Water

The 2015 Nepal earthquakes threatened to exacerbate the ongoing struggle with waterborne diseases by damaging already fragile sewer systems that leak pathogens into the water supply.

Nepal: Life After An Earthquake

Aid workers have not been able to reach some of the remote parts of Nepal. So it's up to the villagers to rebuild their homes and their lives. And the clock is ticking as monsoon season nears.

"House Call in Hell" cited in Baptist Press article

By Baptist Press Staff

A Baptist Press article describing prison conditions in Haiti highlights Pulitzer Center reporting on Haiti's National Penitentiary by Antigone Barton and Steve Sapienza:

The men, by contrast, are imprisoned in Haiti's notorious National Penitentiary, a facility located just a few blocks from the country's National Palace in central Port-au-Prince that was known for squalid conditions before it was largely destroyed by the Jan. 12 quake.

LiveHopeLove.com Wins an Emmy!

Pulitzer Center's multimedia website on the human face of HIV/AIDS in Jamaica has won an Emmy for new approaches to news and documentary programming, in the arts, lifestyle and culture category, announced Sept 21, at the 30th annual News & Documentary Emmy Awards at the Lincoln Center's Rose Theater in New York City.

HOPE: Excerpts from the National Black Theatre Festival

HOPE is a multimedia performance based on poems by Kwame Dawes, poet in residence at the University of South Carolina and set to music by composer Kevin Simmonds. The work grew out of a Pulitzer Center commission to report on the impact of HIV/AIDS on Jamaica, the country where Kwame Dawes grew up. While in Jamaica Dawes wrote poems in response to the stories he heard.

HIV-AIDS in the Caribbean: Facing the Epidemic Just Off US Shores

This Saturday, December 1, is World AIDS Day, a moment each year for special focus on the epidemic. Two hours away from American shores people face this epidemic daily. The Dominican Republic and Haiti boast the highest rates in this hemisphere of the virus that leads to AIDS. And it is a story that has been overlooked in the American mainstream media.

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