Issue

On War and Peace

Twenty years after the Rwandan genocide, thousands of maimed amputees remind us of the war that took 500,000 lives in 100 days. War leaves marks that cannot be erased—not only in Rwanda, but on every continent.

Reporting from On War and Peace examines the roots of conflict, whether it be religious hatred, sectarian rivalry, a security vacuum, the struggle for natural resources, or the desperation that results from poverty.

Pulitzer Center journalists also cover war’s aftermath: the transitional governments that result in chaos, diplomacy that goes awry, peace talks that never end, and the people who suffer the consequences, young and old. We see the children who go hungry, lose their homes, leave school, become combatants, or join the jihad.

Often the end to conflict leaves turmoil in its wake while the road to peace seems circuitous: In South Sudan, rebel-commanders-turned politicians plunge the country into civil war. In the U.S., troops return home from one war only to be re-deployed to another. But everywhere, in every conflict, there are also voices crying out for peace, determined to heal the divide.

On War and Peace

August 17, 2017

Syria: The Next Chapter

Gayle Tzemach Lemmon

The Syrian war: We see the headlines, but know far less about the people caught in the conflict's crosshairs. What comes next for them, and how will that impact the future of the country and the wider Middle East?

August 06, 2017

Data in a Crisis

Amy Maxmen, Neil Brandvold

In the chaos of crisis and human displacement, aid organizations struggle to track, analyze and respond to information fast enough to provide help. Tech and data science is providing a solution.

July 16, 2017

Inside Jordan: Life after the Syrian War

Aman Madan

Jordanian Identity is as ambiguous as it is rapidly evolving. After decades of championing coexistence, Jordanian identity remains an elusive social and political phenomenon.

February 06, 2017

The Rebirth of the Shi'a-Sunni Divide

Geneive Abdo

After years of the raging wars in Iraq and Syria, most people still think the conflicts are about territory and political power. But religious practice and belief have a lot to do with it.

January 19, 2017

Afghan Peace Talks

May Jeong

The task of making peace in Afghanistan seem to have fallen on the shoulders of unlikely men. This is the story of their efforts to end the war in Afghanistan.

This Week: The President's Wealth

This week: President Kabila's vast network of family-owned businesses, a comedy group in India fights ISIS with laughter, and Syrian refugees look for a sense of belonging in Germany.

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