Issue

On War and Peace

Twenty years after the Rwandan genocide, thousands of maimed amputees remind us of the war that took 500,000 lives in 100 days. War leaves marks that cannot be erased—not only in Rwanda, but on every continent.

Reporting from On War and Peace examines the roots of conflict, whether it be religious hatred, sectarian rivalry, a security vacuum, the struggle for natural resources, or the desperation that results from poverty.

Pulitzer Center journalists also cover war’s aftermath: the transitional governments that result in chaos, diplomacy that goes awry, peace talks that never end, and the people who suffer the consequences, young and old. We see the children who go hungry, lose their homes, leave school, become combatants, or join the jihad.

Often the end to conflict leaves turmoil in its wake while the road to peace seems circuitous: In South Sudan, rebel-commanders-turned politicians plunge the country into civil war. In the U.S., troops return home from one war only to be re-deployed to another. But everywhere, in every conflict, there are also voices crying out for peace, determined to heal the divide.

On War and Peace

March 16, 2018

Obstacles to Balkans Peace

Malcolm Brabant

Russian meddling, nationalist rhetoric, and lingering hatred block Balkan conflict zones' progress.

December 20, 2017

Trauma Among Syrian Refugees

Sawsan Morrar

While Syrians find refuge and aid in Jordan, little has been done to address the mental trauma they have faced—until now.

December 12, 2017

What Grows in Bloody Ground

Saul G. Elbein

Caught between a rising China and a retreating United States, the Philippine government launches twin wars against the forces it says threaten to tear it apart: Chinese drug cartels and ISIS.

December 11, 2017

Rohingya Under Attack

Kristen Gelineau, Todd Pitman, Maye-e Wong, Rishabh Raj Jain

"All I have left are my words," the Rohingya Muslim refugee said. The AP documents systematic gang rape of Rohingya women by the Myanmar military, and reconstructs a massacre in one Rohingya village.

November 27, 2017

An American War in the Sahara

Joe Penney

The U.S. military is building a major drone base in the Sahara Desert in Niger. Joe Penney looks at how an increasing American military presence will change the West African country.

October 31, 2017

Iran's Victims of Nerve Agent Warfare

Richard Stone

During the Iran-Iraq War in the 1980s, chemical weapons killed or sickened tens of thousands of Iranians. Studies of the survivors are helping to prepare for—or even deter—future attacks.

At the Khmer Rouge Tribunal

The Khmer Rouge Tribunal—"Asia's Nuremberg"—was created in 1997 to bring accountability for the Khmer Rouge era atrocities. 20 years and $320 million later, it has secured only three convictions.

Meet the Journalist: Ewen MacAskill

Ewen MacAskill visits Villa Grimaldi, a secret detention center in Chile, while uncovering the story of Roberto Kozak, a diplomat who helped save 30,000 prisoners after the 1973 military coup.

Beyond War: The Rohingya: A Genocide On Our Watch?

At a Beyond War conference panel, journalists and Pulitzer Center grantees discuss their reporting on the Rohingya crisis while the former Ambassador to Burma explained attempts by the United States to curb the persecution.

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