Issue

On War and Peace

Twenty years after the Rwandan genocide, thousands of maimed amputees remind us of the war that took 500,000 lives in 100 days. War leaves marks that cannot be erased—not only in Rwanda, but on every continent.

Reporting from On War and Peace examines the roots of conflict, whether it be religious hatred, sectarian rivalry, a security vacuum, the struggle for natural resources, or the desperation that results from poverty.

Pulitzer Center journalists also cover war’s aftermath: the transitional governments that result in chaos, diplomacy that goes awry, peace talks that never end, and the people who suffer the consequences, young and old. We see the children who go hungry, lose their homes, leave school, become combatants, or join the jihad.

Often the end to conflict leaves turmoil in its wake while the road to peace seems circuitous: In South Sudan, rebel-commanders-turned politicians plunge the country into civil war. In the U.S., troops return home from one war only to be re-deployed to another. But everywhere, in every conflict, there are also voices crying out for peace, determined to heal the divide.

On War and Peace

January 19, 2017

Afghan Peace Talks

May Jeong

The task of making peace in Afghanistan seem to have fallen on the shoulders of unlikely men. This is the story of their efforts to end the war in Afghanistan.

January 02, 2017

A Look Inside South Sudan's Bitter War

Cassandra Vinograd

Mass killings, mass rape, ethnic cleansing, starvation and a lack of international will to act against the specter of genocide: A rare look inside the crisis in South Sudan.

December 19, 2016

Finding Home

Lynsey Addario, Aryn Baker, Francesca Trianni

Following the lives of four Syrian refugee mothers and their babies from the day these women gave birth through their newborns’ all-important milestones: first smiles, first meals, first steps.

December 19, 2016

Mugabe's Last Days

Martin Fletcher

What will happen when Robert Mugabe's 36-year rule in Zimbabwe ends? Will life for millions of his oppressed, destitute countrymen get better—or even worse?

December 14, 2016

Latin America's Schindler

Ewen MacAskill

Roberto Kozak is virtually unknown. And yet this quiet man played a crucial role after the 1973 coup in Chile and he helped tens of thousands of prisoners out of custody and to find safe havens overseas.

Drones in the Sahara

A massive U.S. drone base could destabilize Niger — and may even be illegal under its constitution.

How to Defeat a Nerve Agent

The threat of future nerve agent attacks is spurring urgent efforts to find better countermeasures, with several promising compounds in the pipeline.

Meet the Journalist: Mark Johnson

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reporter Mark Johnson discusses his project, "The Healing," on the efforts of a Syrian-born pediatric neurologist to help refugees from Syria who are stuck in the Zaatari camp in Jordan.

Meet the Journalist: Paul A. Kramer

As the U.S. government responded to Hurricane Katrina what difference did it make that the nation was at war? In what ways were post-Katrina relief operations experienced as the war “coming home"?

Meet the Journalist: Ben Taub

Journalist Ben Taub discusses his project, "The Assad Files," the story of how a group of war crimes investigators smuggled 600,000 pages of government documents out of Syria.

This Week: Friends With Dictators

This week: The U.S.'s troublesome alliances with African dictators, Pulitzer tackles homophobia through NewsArts, and the true meaning of the Iraqi Kurdish referendum.