Issue

On War and Peace

Twenty years after the Rwandan genocide, thousands of maimed amputees remind us of the war that took 500,000 lives in 100 days. War leaves marks that cannot be erased—not only in Rwanda, but on every continent.

Reporting from On War and Peace examines the roots of conflict, whether it be religious hatred, sectarian rivalry, a security vacuum, the struggle for natural resources, or the desperation that results from poverty.

Pulitzer Center journalists also cover war’s aftermath: the transitional governments that result in chaos, diplomacy that goes awry, peace talks that never end, and the people who suffer the consequences, young and old. We see the children who go hungry, lose their homes, leave school, become combatants, or join the jihad.

Often the end to conflict leaves turmoil in its wake while the road to peace seems circuitous: In South Sudan, rebel-commanders-turned politicians plunge the country into civil war. In the U.S., troops return home from one war only to be re-deployed to another. But everywhere, in every conflict, there are also voices crying out for peace, determined to heal the divide.

On War and Peace

October 31, 2017

Iran's Victims of Nerve Agent Warfare

Richard Stone

During the Iran-Iraq War in the 1980s, chemical weapons killed or sickened tens of thousands of Iranians. Studies of the survivors are helping to prepare for—or even deter—future attacks.

October 25, 2017

Laos: Remnants from War

Erin McGoff

Erin McGoff is producing a full-length feature independent documentary titled "Little Land of Mines" about the resilience of the Lao people as they live among and work to clear 80 million unexploded ordnance from the U.S. Secret War in Laos.

October 11, 2017

Iran Wins in Iraq

Reza Sayah, Gelareh Kiazand

In a multi-part series for PBS NewsHour , Reza Sayah and Gelareh Kiazand look at Iran’s influence in its war-torn neighbor.

September 26, 2017

'Treasonous' Young Kurds and a Referendum

Kenneth R. Rosen

Iraqi Kurdistan wants to split from Iraq's central government. But a group of young Kurds have joined controversial Baghdad-backed militias of Iraq. They provide a unique window on where the country may be heading.

September 05, 2017

C.A.R. Crisis: When the State Is Absent

Cassandra Vinograd

As the Central African Republic slips back into chaos, the government is mostly powerless to intervene. Armed groups hold the power. Here's what happens—and who steps in—when state authority is absent.

Meet the Journalist: Ewen MacAskill

Ewen MacAskill visits Villa Grimaldi, a secret detention center in Chile, while uncovering the story of Roberto Kozak, a diplomat who helped save 30,000 prisoners after the 1973 military coup.

Beyond War: The Rohingya: A Genocide On Our Watch?

At a Beyond War conference panel, journalists and Pulitzer Center grantees discuss their reporting on the Rohingya crisis while the former Ambassador to Burma explained attempts by the United States to curb the persecution.

This Week: The U.S.-Mexico Border: A View from Above

This week: Trump's plan to build a wall between the U.S. and Mexico is still in question, a growing alliance between Russia and the Central African Republic threaten the U.S.'s influence in the region, and see the highlights of the Pulitzer Center's recent conference weekend.

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