Issue

On War and Peace

Nearly thirty years after the Rwandan genocide, thousands of maimed amputees remind us of the war that took 500,000 lives in 100 days. War leaves marks that cannot be erased—not only in Rwanda, but on every continent.

Reporting from On War and Peace examines the roots of conflict, whether it be religious hatred, sectarian rivalry, a security vacuum, the struggle for natural resources, or the desperation that results from poverty.

Pulitzer Center journalists also cover war’s aftermath: the transitional governments that result in chaos, diplomacy that goes awry, peace talks that never end, and the people who suffer the consequences, young and old. We see the children who go hungry, lose their homes, leave school, become combatants, or join the jihad.

Often the end to conflict leaves turmoil in its wake while the road to peace seems circuitous: In South Sudan, rebel-commanders-turned politicians plunge the country into civil war. In the U.S., troops return home from one war only to be re-deployed to another. But everywhere, in every conflict, there are also voices crying out for peace, determined to heal the divide.

On War and Peace

The Only Way Out in El Salvador

In El Salvador, brutal gangs like MS-13 and 18th Street do not allow members to quit without penalty of death, perpetuating an endless cycle of violence. There's only one exception: joining an evangelical church.

The Enduring Allure of Mexico's Zapatistas

An army of campesinos armed with little but words, a social movement, and a radical democratic project buried deep in the Mexican jungle: The Zapatistas defy easy categorization. This is their story.

Religion and Reconstruction in Iraq

As Iraq's religious and ethnic minority groups return to Mosul and the Nineveh plains, how are they supposed to rebuild not only their homes, but also their relations with one another?

A Country in Turmoil

Siddharthya Roy travels to Bangladesh and files a series of reports documenting the many threads of political turmoil and violence that have gripped the delta nation.

Justice for the Enemy

The war against ISIS in Iraq is officially over. Now the government faces another momentous task: It must bring those responsible to account.

Bruce Willis z Banja Luki

Facing the choice of adapting and censoring themselves, or living in fear of a violent attack, only the few reporting for Republika Srpska have continued publishing as independent journalists—and have paid dearly for it.

Meet the Journalists: Phil Caller and Tania Rashid

Phil Caller and Tania Rashid discuss their three-part series for PBS NewsHour on the Rohingya refugee crisis—reporting on the mass exodus, rape, child marriage, and human trafficking—and finding a strong will to live and tenacity among the people.

Meet the Journalist: Peter Gwin

How does a country fail? Peter Gwin spent three years traveling to the Central African Republic to look at how a rebellion destroyed the nation and what's happened to its wealth of resources.

This Week: Child Labor and Your Smartphone

This week: cobalt mining comes from one of the planet's poorest countries and all too often it is mined by children, skepticism about Kosovo's deradicalization and rehabilitation programs for returning jihadists, and Pulitzer Center welcomes new Executive Editor, Indira Lakshmanan.

This Week: Losing Earth

This week: the decade we almost stopped climate change, the U.S.-backed coalition in Yemen is paying Al-Qaeda militants, and Magnum photographers journey through six countries where indigenous people are fighting to keep the rights to their land.

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