Issue

On War and Peace

Twenty years after the Rwandan genocide, thousands of maimed amputees remind us of the war that took 500,000 lives in 100 days. War leaves marks that cannot be erased—not only in Rwanda, but on every continent.

Reporting from On War and Peace examines the roots of conflict, whether it be religious hatred, sectarian rivalry, a security vacuum, the struggle for natural resources, or the desperation that results from poverty.

Pulitzer Center journalists also cover war’s aftermath: the transitional governments that result in chaos, diplomacy that goes awry, peace talks that never end, and the people who suffer the consequences, young and old. We see the children who go hungry, lose their homes, leave school, become combatants, or join the jihad.

Often the end to conflict leaves turmoil in its wake while the road to peace seems circuitous: In South Sudan, rebel-commanders-turned politicians plunge the country into civil war. In the U.S., troops return home from one war only to be re-deployed to another. But everywhere, in every conflict, there are also voices crying out for peace, determined to heal the divide.

On War and Peace

July 19, 2018

The Only Way Out in El Salvador

Danny Gold

In El Salvador, brutal gangs like MS-13 and 18th Street do not allow members to quit without penalty of death, perpetuating an endless cycle of violence. There's only one exception: joining an evangelical church.

July 08, 2018

The Enduring Allure of Mexico's Zapatistas

Jared Olson

An army of campesinos armed with little but words, a social movement, and a radical democratic project buried deep in the Mexican jungle: The Zapatistas defy easy categorization. This is their story.

July 06, 2018

Religion and Reconstruction in Iraq

Alice Su

As Iraq's religious and ethnic minority groups return to Mosul and the Nineveh plains, how are they supposed to rebuild not only their homes, but also their relations with one another?

June 16, 2018

Justice for the Enemy

Simona Foltyn

The war against ISIS in Iraq is officially over. Now the government faces another momentous task: It must bring those responsible to account.

May 17, 2018

Inside Yemen

Marcia Biggs, Javier Manzano

As the conflict in Yemen enters its fourth year, PBS NewsHour 's Marcia Biggs travels to the Middle East's poorest nation to report on what the U.N. is calling the "world's worst humanitarian crisis."

The Displaced Campesinos of Nicolas Ruiz

Forced to flee their homes by a paramilitary group, the campesinos of Nicolas Ruiz—a remote farming village in southern Mexico—have gathered in the city to demand justice and reparations.

After ISIS, Iraq Is Still Broken

One year after the liberation of Mosul, distrust, fear, and a paralyzing sense of insecurity plague the country’s religious and ethnic minorities.

This Week: Losing Earth

This week: the decade we almost stopped climate change, the U.S.-backed coalition in Yemen is paying Al-Qaeda militants, and Magnum photographers journey through six countries where indigenous people are fighting to keep the rights to their land.

This Week: Poverty in America

This Week: Nearly one in five children in America suffers from being poor, deportations are straining relations between Australia and New Zealand, and ISIS has undermined faith in Iraq.