Issue

Global Health: Chronic Illnesses and Challenges

Here Pulitzer Center journalists dig into the causes, treatment, and consequences of increasingly prevalent chronic illnesses, such as heart disease, diabetes, and silicosis—diseases that, if left untreated, rob communities of both productivity and quality of life.

We also look at the global footprint of cancer, which kills more people than HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria combined. We examine the disproportionate burden placed on poorer countries, as well as the medical and business innovations that allow for treatment once thought too costly or too difficult to deliver.

Other projects relate to the rise of mental health awareness throughout the world. Our grantees investigate the impact of trauma on Syrian refugees and the lack of infrastructure to address it. They report on the effects that climate change will have on mental health in the future. And they analyze the demographic shift in countries faced with the challenges of caring for an aging population.

Chronic Illnesses and Challenges highlights the non-communicable diseases that people can’t catch, but can’t seem to get rid of, either. For both journalists and scientists, the emerging challenge is to conquer the chronic.

Global Health: Chronic Illnesses and Challenges

September 12, 2017

To Win the War on Lyme, Look at France

David Scales

Despite having fewer yearly cases than Massachusetts, France is the first country to release a national plan on Lyme disease. What can France's prevention, research and treatment efforts teach us?

June 23, 2017

Bringing Hope to Women with Cancer in Haiti

Kate Corrigan, Anna Russell

Cancer is a terrifying word to anyone, but for women living in developing countries, it can be truly devastating. In Haiti, women must overcome immense challenges to seek diagnosis and care.

January 31, 2017

Mental Illness and the Global Health Agenda

Joanne Silberner

Mental illnesses take a huge toll on people in low and middle income countries, yet they're virtually ignored by most governments and aid agencies. That's starting to change.

Walter Rodney Commemoration

After our first full day in Guyana, Madeline Bishop and I met a contact at the commemoration for Walter Rodney hosted by the Working People’s Alliance, a socialist political party.

Guyana: A Morning in Red Village

In Guyana, domestic violence has become a part of everyday life. Campbell Rawlins spends a morning in a housing project to experience what life is like in one of the most isolated communities.

Type 1 Diabetes in Rural Costa Rica

If a family is unable to pay for a child with Type 1 diabetes, only the most economical supplies are provided by the Costa Rican Government. This allows little to no flexibility in one's life.

Meet the Journalist: David Scales

Scales travels to Nancy and Strasbourg to understand how the new French plan to combat Lyme and tick-borne diseases was unfolding. Here, he shares some surprises he found along the way.

Meet the Journalist: Sonia Shah

Tens of thousands of people fleeing bombs and beheadings are trapped in squalid refugee camps and ad hoc settlements across Greece. Will the country's tattered health system be able to prevent an epidemic?

"The End of AIDS?" Wins an Emmy

Another big win PBS NewsHour, Science, and the Pulitzer Center, for "The End of AIDS?" Finding new ways to tell stories that matter on issues that affect us all.

Another Win for "The End of AIDS?"

Pulitzer Center-supported PBS NewsHour series wins a 2017 Communication Award from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.