Issue

Global Health: Chronic Illnesses and Challenges

Here Pulitzer Center journalists dig into the causes, treatment, and consequences of increasingly prevalent chronic illnesses, such as heart disease, diabetes, and silicosis—diseases that, if left untreated, rob communities of both productivity and quality of life.

We also look at the global footprint of cancer, which kills more people than HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria combined. We examine the disproportionate burden placed on poorer countries, as well as the medical and business innovations that allow for treatment once thought too costly or too difficult to deliver.

Other projects relate to the rise of mental health awareness throughout the world. Our grantees investigate the impact of trauma on Syrian refugees and the lack of infrastructure to address it. They report on the effects that climate change will have on mental health in the future. And they analyze the demographic shift in countries faced with the challenges of caring for an aging population.

Chronic Illnesses and Challenges highlights the non-communicable diseases that people can’t catch, but can’t seem to get rid of, either. For both journalists and scientists, the emerging challenge is to conquer the chronic.

Global Health: Chronic Illnesses and Challenges

April 14, 2014

Liberia: Building a Mental Health Infrastructure

Jim Burress

Years after the end of brutal, decades-long civil war, Liberia has little in terms of a mental health infrastructure. But the need is great, and progress is painstakingly slow

November 06, 2013

Toxic Development: The Cost of Pollution in India

Sean Gallagher

Pollution in India is a hidden problem with catastrophic consequences affecting rural and urban areas. Chromium contamination, lead pollution and pesticide poisoning have left a toxic trail.

September 01, 2013

Nepal’s Dental Crisis and an Unlikely Hero

Jennifer Miller

For 10 years, Laura Spero has provided badly needed dental care for 18,000 Nepalis, with the financial help of her childhood hometown, Bethesda, Md. The program is growing, but can it survive?

How Poverty Affects the Brain

An unprecedented study in Bangladesh could reveal how malnutrition, poor sanitation and other challenges make their mark on child development.

Dying To Breathe

This interactive piece showcases Sim Chi Yin's four-year project Dying To Breathe in its different forms: short film, photo slideshow, text, video, open letter, and radio.

Pulitzer Center Gender Lens Conference Highlights

Two-day conference illuminates why diversity of perspective, across gender, race, ethnicity, religion, matters so much in storytelling.

The World's Most Toxic Places

This week: unregulated textile factories across Asia, a Somali migrant profiled, Jon Sawyer and Marvin Kalb dissect Trump and the media.

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