Global Health: Chronic Illnesses and Challenges

Here Pulitzer Center journalists dig into the causes, treatment, and consequences of increasingly prevalent chronic illnesses, such as heart disease, diabetes, and silicosis—diseases that, if left untreated, rob communities of both productivity and quality of life.

We also look at the global footprint of cancer, which kills more people than HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria combined. We examine the disproportionate burden placed on poorer countries, as well as the medical and business innovations that allow for treatment once thought too costly or too difficult to deliver.

Other projects relate to the rise of mental health awareness throughout the world. Our grantees investigate the impact of trauma on Syrian refugees and the lack of infrastructure to address it. They report on the effects that climate change will have on mental health in the future. And they analyze the demographic shift in countries faced with the challenges of caring for an aging population.

Chronic Illnesses and Challenges highlights the non-communicable diseases that people can’t catch, but can’t seem to get rid of, either. For both journalists and scientists, the emerging challenge is to conquer the chronic.

Global Health: Chronic Illnesses and Challenges

April 27, 2015

Surgery: The 'Neglected Stepchild' of Global Health

Bridget Huber

Surgically-treatable conditions cause more death and disability than HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, combined. Now, a group of doctors is pushing to put surgery on the global health agenda.

April 13, 2015

Poland: Coal’s Deadly Toll

Beth Gardiner

Poland gets 90 percent of its power and much of its heat by burning coal, one of the dirtiest of fuels. The consequences for Poles' health are severe, and one polluted city is now pushing back

November 10, 2014

Health and Obesity in the UK

Jamie Walsh

Half the population of the United Kingdom may be obese by 2050. What are the causes and what is being done?

September 02, 2014

Cervical Cancer in Uganda

Sascha Garrey

In the U.S., the HPV vaccine and regular pap smears have almost stopped the pervasiveness of cervical cancer in its tracks. In Uganda, however, cervical cancer is the most fatal cancer for women.

June 30, 2014

Soil Pollution in China

He Guangwei

China confronts a hidden but grave environmental threat—soil pollution related to industrial development that affects as much as one fifth of China's farmland.

How Poverty Affects the Brain

An unprecedented study in Bangladesh could reveal how malnutrition, poor sanitation and other challenges make their mark on child development.

Dying To Breathe

This interactive piece showcases Sim Chi Yin's four-year project Dying To Breathe in its different forms: short film, photo slideshow, text, video, open letter, and radio.

Pulitzer Center Gender Lens Conference Highlights

Two-day conference illuminates why diversity of perspective, across gender, race, ethnicity, religion, matters so much in storytelling.

The World's Most Toxic Places

This week: unregulated textile factories across Asia, a Somali migrant profiled, Jon Sawyer and Marvin Kalb dissect Trump and the media.