Issue

Fragile States

The balance of power between strong states was for decades the dominant issue in discussions of international security. But today, it is fragile states that are seen by many as posing potentially greater threats. Weak infrastructures, internal conflict, and lack of economic development provide fertile ground for trafficking, piracy, terrorism, nuclear proliferation, disease pandemics, regional tensions, and even genocide.

As a result, there is a growing movement in the international community to find comprehensive ways to promote stronger states, as well as more effective solutions to deal with those that are already on the brink of failure.

In Fragile States, you'll find reporting from around the world—from East Timor to Haiti, from Guinea Bissau to Afghanistan. The reporting demonstrates the dangers weak states pose—and also the international interventions that appear to be making a difference.

Fragile States was produced by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting in partnership with The Bureau for International Reporting. Support provided by the Stanley Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

Fragile States

July 23, 2013

Afghanistan: On Its Own

Jeffrey E. Stern

Foreign troops are leaving Afghanistan. As the decade-long effort to secure the country draws to a close, how are Afghanistan’s most vulnerable communities preparing for the challenges that lie ahead?

April 11, 2013

Congo: Consequences of a Conflict with No End

Fiona Lloyd-Davies, Pete Jones

With suffering in Congo unabated, a series of multimedia projects examines a ‘conflict-free’ tin mine and investigates the mass rape of civilians during the November 2012 rebellion.

December 30, 2012

Education: Pakistan's Other Emergency

Beenish Ahmed

Pakistan is home to more out-of-school children than almost any country in the world. And there's more than just the Taliban keeping the country’s young people from an education.