Jason Motlagh speaks at The George Washington University on the eve of FotoWeek DC. Image by Jake Naughton. United States, 2012.

Our Global Goods: Local Costs exhibition at FotoWeek DC 2012 explores the human costs of producing the goods that have become essential to our lifestyles. It features the work of photojournalists Nadia Shira Cohen, Peter DiCampo, Dominic Bracco II, Jason Motlagh and Larry Price as they track gold, chocolate and seafood from around the world. Jake Naughton, the Center's multimedia projects coordinator, curated the show with assistance from Meghan Dhaliwal and Uliana Bazar. To invite more people into the global conversation, these Pulitzer Center grantees ventured beyond the exhibition space to share their work at public discussions and schools across Washington, DC. Scroll down to see moments from this incredible weeklong celebration of photography and exploration of the global commodities market.

Images by Meghan Dhaliwal and Jake Naughton.

#WhoMadeMy?
We used the hashtag #WhoMadeMy to broaden the conversation about the people behind our products online, at the FotoWeek DC exhibition and in schools. Join us by tweeting or Instagramming stories, questions or images about your goods.

"Who made my chocolate?" at FotoWeek DC.

"Who made my tea?" at FotoWeek DC.

"Who made my jacket?" at Maret School in Washington, DC.

"Who made my computer?" at FotoWeek DC.

"Who made my hat?" at Maret School in Washington, DC.

"Who made my leather boots?" at FotoWeek DC.

"Who made my iPhone?" at FotoWeek DC.

"Who made my eyeliner?" at Maret School in Washington, DC.

"Who made my fish?" at FotoWeek DC.

"Who made my notebook?" at Maret School in Washington, DC.

"Who made my eyeglasses?" at FotoWeek DC.

"Who made my camera?" at FotoWeek DC.

"Who made my shoes?" at Maret School in Washington, DC.

The interactive space of the Global Goods: Local Costs exhibition.

Engaging with Classrooms
The five Pulitzer Center grantees shared their photography with schools in the Washington, DC area, encouraging students to consider the people behind products and commodities we consume. These visits are part of an ongoing educational outreach program by the Pulitzer Center to bring a global perspective to classrooms through in-person visits with journalists and a wide range of curricular materials.

Peter DiCampo and Jason Motlagh with students at Wilson High School in Washington, DC. Peter shared his project on cocoa farming in Ivory Coast, and Jason shared his work on Burmese migrants working in Thailand's shrimp industry.

Larry Price speaks with journalism students in Laura Brockman's class at Robinson Secondary School in Fairfax, VA, about child labor and gold mining in the Philippines.

Chemistry students in Jeanne Deslich's class at Maret School in Washington, DC, talked about gold mining in Romania with Nadia Shira Cohen and fishing communities in Mexico with Dominic Bracco II.

Nadia Shira Cohen visited two third-grade classes at Maury Elementary School in Washington, DC.

Maury Elementary School in Washington, DC.

Jason Motlagh speaks with students from Springside Chestnut Hill Academy in Philadelphia at the Pulitzer Center headquarters in Washington, DC.

Continuing the Conversation
The photojournalists shared the story behind their images and reporting at discussions at The George Washington University and FotoWeek DC. Below are photos from the Nov. 8 presentation and discussion organized in collaboration with the School of Public Affairs and Media at The George Washington University, a Campus Consortium partner.

Nathalie Applewhite, managing director of the Pulitzer Center.

Peter DiCampo.

Nadia Shira Cohen.

Larry Price.

Dominic Bracco II.

Jason Motlagh.

Project

The Sea of Cortez is—or was—a vast and lush underwater paradise. Industrial fishing operations are now decimating the sea's bounty. Tuna, red snapper, and shark are all but gone.

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“Hassan al Faidi…casts his fishing line into the darkling waves…He is feeling the slow tug of the waves, the gravelly vibration of the hook as it drags across coral, the gentle nudge of a fish’s li