Event

Climate Change: Underreported and Urgent Stories

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A man stands on the edge of a precipice overlooking Dandora, Korogocho’s 30-acre massive dump of smoldering garbage. People scavenge through the dump looking for anything of value. Image by Mark Hoffman. Kenya, 2017.

A man stands on the edge of a precipice overlooking Dandora, Korogocho’s 30-acre massive dump of smoldering garbage. People scavenge through the dump looking for anything of value. Image by Mark Hoffman. Kenya, 2017.

Wednesday, November 29, 2017 - 2:30PM
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Sheldon Hall
615 N. Wolfe Street
Baltimore, MD 21205
United States

Join us on WednesdayNovember 29, 2017, for "Climate Change: Underreported and Urgent Stories," the 2017 Johns Hopkins Bloomberg-Pulitzer Center Global Health Symposium in BaltimoreMD. The conversation at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, a Campus Consortium partner, focuses on how a changing environment affects our well-being.

Climate change media coverage often tells the same stories of consequences and causes: melting glaciers, smog-choked cities, extreme weather. The 5th Johns Hopkins-Pulitzer Center Symposium breaks that narrative by exploring some underreported effects and drivers of climate change, including disease outbreaks, global food security, the move to unconventional fossil fuels and climate justice.

Two Pulitzer Center grantee journalists speak at the symposium, Mark Johnson and Lisa Palmer. Johnson, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, recently has reported on how humans are driving the rise of diseases. Palmer, author of Hot, Hungry Planet: The Fight to Stop a Global Food Crisis in the Face of Climate Change, recently has reported on global agriculture and issues of sustainability as well as biological diversity. 

Joining the journalists at the symposium are Brian Schwartz, MD, MS; and Genee Smith, PhD, both professors of Environmental Health and Engineering at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

The symposium will be followed by a reception at 4:00pm. The event is free and open to the public, but space is limited—so be sure to register soon