We live in an era saturated with images of all kinds clamoring for our attention. Combine this with constantly shrinking space for serious, thought-provoking photography on complex issues, and a clear problem emerges. As a result, photojournalists must explore new ways to tell stories and identify or create new outlets for such work to be seen.

The Pulitzer Center has proven again and again its commitment to funding and promoting important photojournalism that pushes the boundaries of our definition of crises and explores avenues beyond traditional presentation.

This exhibit captures the compelling work of eight of our photographer partners whose work embodies this idea. From identifying important, but seemingly intractable, systemic issues to creating long-term, deeply informed bodies of work to distributing the completed work in non-traditional venues, this work challenges our notions of what to expect from images of crisis.

Dominic Bracco II uniquely captures the existential challenges faced by Los NiNis—the youth in Ciudad Juarez trapped between devastating gang violence and lack of opportunity.

Sean Gallagher offers us insight into the fragile and subtle relationship China has with its deteriorating natural environment, from desertification to shrinking wetlands to deforestation.

Andre Lambertson documented stories of individuals rebuilding their lives with strength, faith and an inner power few may understand following the devastating earthquake.

Richard Mosse challenges our ideas of what documentary photography can do with his vivid and complex images of Congo's brutal civil war using a film that renders the lush jungle bright pink.

David Rochkind has spent the past three years working on photo reports about tuberculosis, traveling to Kenya, South Africa, India and Moldova and has compiled that work into an education platform at http://tbepidemic.org.

Stephanie Sinclair investigated the phenomenon of child marriage over an eight-year period in India, Yemen, Afghanistan, Nepal and Ethiopia in conjunction with National Geographic, which ran a feature story on child marriage in the June 2011 issue.

James Whitlow Delano has lived in Asia for 17 years and has turned a shrewd eye to documenting environmental crises amid an evolving world. His current work examines deforestation at the hands of Malaysia's "green" biofuel plantations.

Marcus Bleasdale has covered the conflict in the Democratic Republic Congo for over 10 years. His most recent body of work on the Lord's Resistance Army combines landscapes depicting the aftermath of LRA attacks and intimate portraits of those affected.

Location: 1800 L St. NW
The event is free, but registration is required

The photojournalists featured in the gallery will also be participating in a panel at George Washington University Nov. 7 at 5:30 p.m. Following the panel, journalists and attendees will gather for a reception outside Lisner Auditorium to view a projection of Richard Mosse's work, Infra.

Project

Ciudad Juarez, across the border from El Paso, Texas, has become the murder capital of the world. Most vulnerable are Los Ninis, young men and women who earned their name from “ni estudian, ni trabajan”—those who neither work nor study.

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