Photographer Andre Lambertson took this photograph of Carroll Flemming as part of his reporting project with poet Kwame Dawes on the reaction of churches and other religious communities in Jamaica to HIV/AIDs. Image by Andre Lambertson. Jamaica, 2014. Add this image to a lesson

Join us on Wednesday, November 16, 2016, when New York-based photographer Andre Lambertson visits Spelman College in Atlanta. His work explores issues from Baltimore and New Orleans to the Caribbean and West Africa.

His reporting projects with the Pulitzer Center look at life for those affected by HIV/AIDS since the Haiti earthquake, the response from Jamaican religious communities to LGBTQ rights and those living with HIV/AIDS, and the struggles of Liberian youth after the 14-year civil war.

Lambertson is a New York-based photojournalist, teacher, and filmmaker committed to documenting stories of hope, healing, and transformation. He creates award-winning photo essays on social issues for magazines, books, foundations, advocacy organizations and museums including Time, US News & World Report, Life, National Geographic, The New York Times Magazine, The Ford Foundation, and The Smithsonian Museum.

The visit launches the Spelman College-Pulitzer Center Campus Consortium Partnership. Rebecca Kaplan, ACLS/Mellon Pulitzer Center fellow, joins Lambertson to speak about the Pulitzer Center and international reporting opportunities for students.

Photographer Andre Lambertson
Wednesday, November 16, 2016
12:30 pm - 2 pm
Spelman College
Camille Olivia Hanks Cosby, Ed.D. Academic Center Auditorium
440 Westview Drive SW
Atlanta, GA

Project

Reporter Ruthie Ackerman and photographer Andre Lambertson travel from Staten Island to Liberia, investigating the lives and struggles of Liberian youth after the 14-year civil war.

Recently

April 13, 2016 /
Fareed Mostoufi, Seiler Smith
This week's news on all things Pulitzer Center Education.
June 15, 2015 / Virginia Quarterly Review
Kwame Dawes, Andre Lambertson
A multimedia exploration of HIV/AIDS, homophobia, and the church in Jamaica, featuring a short documentary and a series of video poems.