by Cameron Conaway
Along the banks of the Ganges River in the lap of the Himalayas, Cameron Conaway talks about why he has embarked on his project "Rejuvenating the Ganga."
World Religions
by Benedict Moran
Papua New Guinea has the highest rate of tuberculosis in the Pacific, and the epidemic is being described as a national disaster.
Health
by Jonathan M. Katz, Allison Shelley
Journalists Jonathan M. Katz and Allison Shelley take a deep look at the Clintons' projects and prospects in Haiti.
Economics
Image by Elizabeth Dickinson. Saudi Arabia, 2015.
by Elizabeth Dickinson
Saudi Arabia's King Salman has been on the throne since January 2015, but already has signaled important shifts in the country’s internal governance and foreign policy.
Religion and religious tolerance
by Erika Check Hayden
The courage and bravery of Ebola survivors and others fighting the disease give Erika Check Hayden hope that the world's worst outbreak of the disease can be stopped.
Africa
Image by Juan Herrero. Rwanda, 2015.
by Tik Root, Juan Herrero
More than twenty years after a genocide, a look the next generation of Rwandans and their place in a rapidly changing country.
Africa
by M. Sophia Newman
There's a method to stopping gun violence before it starts--and it has worked in seven countries. Can the method be modified to prevent sexual violence?
Health
by Ty McCormick
Journalist Ty McCormick discusses his reporting on the U.S. legacy in South Sudan, what he calls "a story of multiple failings."
Africa
by Michael Scott Moore
Journalist Michael Scott Moore was held hostage for 32 months by Somali pirates. He is recovering. Will Somalia ever recover?
The Political and Social Conditions of Developing Nations, Modern Day Conflicts
by George Butler
Reportage illustrator George Butler provides a first-hand impression of how things are developing in Afghanistan—and how life continues despite the uncertainty of the country's situation.
Defense, militarization and security, Regional/border disputes, Modern Day Conflicts
by Matt Black
On September 26, 2014, 43 Mexican students went missing in Iguala, a mountain town in the state of Guerrero. This project explores the long-term issues that gave rise to these events.
Human Rights
by Sim Chi Yin
Beijing-based photographer Sim Chi Yin discusses her project on the one million migrant workers who live in basements beneath Beijing's skyscrapers and residential blocks.
Asia, Economics
by Eve Fairbanks
A talk with Pulitzer Center grantee Eve Fairbanks, who reported on "The Real Legacy of José Mujica."
Economics, The Political and Social Conditions of Developing Nations
by Brian Castner, Cheryl Hatch
To assist Liberia in containing Ebola, the US turned to its soldiers from Iraq and Afghanistan from the most battle-hardened unit in the US Army. How does an infantry division fight a disease?
Africa, Health
by Gabe Silverman, Nick Miroff
Nick Miroff and Gabe Silverman of The Washington Post travel to Colombia to investigate the palm oil industry's rise through a decades-long civil war.
Food security, Globalization
by Katie Mathieson
Patagonia, a region shared by Argentina and Chile, is well known for its unparalled panoramic views, unblemished status and remoteness. What will be the impact of a mega-project for dam construction?
Climate change
by Shi Lihong
Journalist Shi Lihong discusses the relationship between Tibetan Buddhism and environmental protection.
Asia, Religion and religious tolerance, Effect of Human Activities on the Earth
by Joshua Hammer
Joshua Hammer discuses his experience in Mali while working on his project, "Taking Timbuktu: Music, Manuscripts and Madness at the Edge of the Sahara."
Africa, Defense, militarization and security, Regional/border disputes, Political Revolutions, Modern Day Conflicts
by Caryle Murphy
Caryle Murphy reports on a growing debate on religion and its place in society in Saudi Arabia.
Religion and religious tolerance, World History, World Religions
Image by Paul Nevin. Kenya, 2014.
by Paul Nevin, Adiba Khan
Kenya continues to lose 7,000 mothers to preventable deaths each year. If the solutions are known, why has there been so little progress in saving their lives?
Africa

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