Issue

Drug Crises

Militant Islamists escort drug convoys through northern Mali in exchange for hefty payments. The U.S. military and Honduran authorities use commando-style tactics to catch traffickers in the remote jungles of La Moskitia. A 15-year old from Ciudad Juarez, the most violent city in Mexico, chooses the clarinet over drugs after dropping out of school twice.

Drug Crises tells of men, women, and children who risk their lives—as drug users, traffickers, smugglers, and enforcement agents. You will find searing portraits of those who suffer from addiction, their family members, and loved ones. These are stories not only of lives lost and opportunities missed, but also of the fear and disruption that can overwhelm a community.

Pulitzer Center journalists expose corruption, extortion, and murder in an often violent war on drugs, fought in all corners of the globe, in Cuba and Crimea, in Bolivia and Burma, and from the Philippines to Tajikistan. They cover various recovery programs, such as opioid substitution therapy, as well as policy debates involving the roles of drug enforcement agents, the police, the military, and government. And they ask important questions: Are drug users criminals or patients in need of medical treatment?

 

Drug Crises

Body Hunters

The mothers of Mexico's missing learn forensic investigative techniques to try to uncover what happened to their children and identify bodies found in mass graves. 

Honduras: "Aqui Vivimos"

"Honduras: Aqui Vivimos" ("Honduras: We Live Here") explores the social conditions—abject poverty, corruption, political disillusionment, and gang culture—that have made Honduras a violent country.

Drawing the Line: The U.S.- Mexico Border

Louie Palu explores the U.S.-Mexico border where violence runs rampant: What does it look like? How has the immigration policy evolved? And what are the economic and security issues?

Along the Burma Road: Soft Power and Piracy

The geopolitics of Southeast Asia are shifting rapidly and China's influence can be seen in the shipping routes along the Mekong--and in the soft power it exercises in countries such as Burma.

Nicaragua Rewind

Back in power since 2007, Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega is leading what he claims is a “second phase of the Sandinista revolution.” Some fear Nicaragua is repeating a cycle of social unrest.

Los Ninis: Mexico's Lost Generation

Ciudad Juarez, across the border from El Paso, Texas, has become the murder capital of the world. Most vulnerable are Los Ninis , young men and women who earned their name from “ni estudian, ni trabajan”—those who neither work nor study.

Fragile States: The Drug War in Central America

Billionaire Mexican drug mafias are muscling into Central America, undermining the region’s feeble governments and bringing violence to levels not seen since the civil wars of the 1970s and 80s.