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Lines and Lineage

2017 CatchLight Fellow Tomas van Houtryve explores the history of the U.S.-Mexico border through period-accurate photography in this photo essay for Harper's.

Offshore Postcard: Confronting Faith

In a new episode of Offshore, produced by Honolulu Civil Beat and PRX, Anita Hofschneider explores the significance of recent lawsuits being brought against Guam’s Catholic Church for sexual abuse.

Only the Bridge Matters Now

Northern Virginia’s Bolivian community is up to 150,000, enough to be Bolivia’s 9th largest city. By sustaining tradition, memory, and love for their hometowns, the community keeps families united.

While Reporting "The Taking," Another Scandal

A local political power broker. A shady contract that poured taxpayer money into his pocket—and his family’s pockets. Our initial digging on the main project unearthed another important story.

Outrage and Inspire

Roger Thurow shares stories of hunger across the world in a new podcast produced in collaboration with the Chicago Council on Global Affairs.

Finding Border Landowners Was Harder Than Expected

Starting with hundreds of cases, we reached out to dozens of property owners who lost land for the border fence. Some had died, some deflected questions to lawyers, and many just didn’t want to talk to us.

February 21, 2014

William & Mary 2013-2014 Sharp Reporting Projects

Hannah Boes, Daniel Casey, Brian Comiskey, Claire Gillespie, Dana Hayes, Olivia Jebb, Elizabeth Pelletier, Meg Schwenzfeier

With support from Pulitzer Center grantees, William & Mary students explore issues from high HIV rates among black gay men in Baltimore to the debate over immigration policy across the U.S.

September 13, 2013

Sea Change: The Pacific’s Perilous Turn

Craig Welch, Steve Ringman

In 2009, The Seattle Times reported that ocean acidification – the plummeting pH of seas from carbon-dioxide emissions – was killing billions of Northwest oysters. That was only the beginning.

July 30, 2013

A Melting Arctic

Yves Eudes, Olivier Truc

Global warming is happening faster around the Arctic Ocean than anywhere else. To adjust to this new climate, local communities must change the way they live and work – for better and for worse.

July 24, 2013

Nigeria: U.S. Dollars and Dubious Results

Ameto Akpe

U.S. development projects target northern Nigeria where poverty, illiteracy and radical Islam shape economic and social realities, but the sustainability of these interventions is rarely discussed.

May 13, 2013

1,000 Days: To Save Women, Children and the World

Roger Thurow

The story of 1,000 days–the vital period from the beginning of a woman's pregnancy to her child's second birthday. The fate of individuals, families, nations–and the world–depends on it.

May 09, 2013

Gun Violence in Chicago: A Global Problem

Rieke Havertz, Carlos Javier Ortiz

As the discussion about tougher gun laws gains momentum in the U.S. after mass shootings in Colorado and Connecticut, Chicago is trapped in a daily cycle of gun violence.

April 02, 2013

Chicago and Guatemala: Too Young to Die

Carlos Javier Ortiz

“Too Young to Die” is a long-term exploration of the tragedy gun violence exacts on Chicago’s streets. Although over 100 children and young people died in 2012, their deaths are often overshadowed.

February 22, 2013

William & Mary 2012-2013 Sharp Reporting Projects

Aly Brahe, Sarah Caspari, Max Lander, Deborah Van Roy, Katie Kennedy, Allyson Zacharoff, Dana McKelvey, Andrea Filzen

The Pulitzer Center and The College of William & Mary continue their unique initiative to provide deeper global learning and storytelling experiences for students.

December 18, 2012

The Vatican and the Nuns

Jason Berry

Cardinals in Rome ordered two investigations of American nuns. Is this a modern-day Inquisition? Jason Berry explores the forces behind this inner struggle of the church on both sides of the Atlantic.

December 17, 2012

Drawing the Line: The U.S.- Mexico Border

Louie Palu

Louie Palu explores the U.S.-Mexico border where violence runs rampant: What does it look like? How has the immigration policy evolved? And what are the economic and security issues?

December 06, 2012

China and Wisconsin: Paper Cuts

Mike De Sisti, John Schmid

Faced with the devastating twin threats of digital and China, can a critical Wisconsin industry survive?

February 23, 2012

A Sharp Initiative

The Pulitzer Center and The College of William & Mary created a unique initiative to provide deeper global learning and storytelling experiences for students.

With support from William & Mary alumni, Anne and Barry Sharp, The College launched its Campus Consortium partnership in fall 2011 with the...

This Week: Seeking Answers for Iran’s Chemical Weapons Survivors

This week: Scientists investigate the long term effects of chemical warfare on Iranian soldiers, a look into how artistic integrity is maintained inside the Chinese Communist system, and more than 100 people are suing Guam's Catholic Church over accusations of sexual abuse by priests.

This Week: Botched Land Grab Along the Border

This week: A land grab at the U.S.-Mexico border reveals how the government might go about building the wall, a history of land grabs by the government are revealed by a laundry list of treaties with American Indian nations, and the women taking on military duty in the Central African Republic.

This Week: Contagion That Travels by Plane

This week: How poor hygiene on planes leads to the spread of dangerous communicable diseases, how Sámi people are caught between a climate change solution and their own livelihoods, and how you can double your holiday gift to the Pulitzer Center.

U.S. Responsibility for China’s Workers

This is a multi-week unit on U.S. companies and the welfare of international workers. Students will examine how U.S. companies manufacture their goods and how they care for their workers abroad.

The World's Disappearing Sand

Students analyze how an author structures and supports a story about disappearing sand reserves, then create visual campaigns that increase awareness about sand depletion.

HIV/AIDS In Palm Beach County, Florida

In this lesson, students will learn about AIDS in Florida, and participate in an activity understand the role of health education and its impact on the AIDS epidemic in the United States.  

Waste disposal

What is the most efficient way to reduce the amount of waste? Can we ever reach the point of waste elimination?

The Nanny's Child

This 45-minute lesson uses a radio piece and photo essay to prompt discussion about immigration and the phenomenon of transnational parenting.

Food Deserts

Our topic under the umbrella of food insecurity is the existence of food deserts in both rural and urban areas within the U.S. and how they compare and/or contrast in their causes and potential...

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