December 23, 2015 /
Evey Wilson
The Pulitzer Center staff share favorite images from 2015.
January 13, 2016 / WBEZ
Claire Provost, Matt Kennard
Grantees Claire Provost and Matt Kennard join WBEZ's Jerome McDonnell to discuss how some of the World Bank's lending practices end up hurting the poor.
December 30, 2015 / Mother Jones
Claire Provost, Matt Kennard
The World Bank is supposed to help the poor. So why do so many of its investments underwrite oligarchs?
November 16, 2015
Akela Lacy, Greg Constantine
Photographer's new book brings together a decade of reporting on a growing global phenomenon that now affects more than 10 million people.
October 22, 2015 / Slideluck Editorial
Spike Johnson
Boys are kidnapped in their early teens, or convinced to join the Tatmadaw (Myanmar Army) and armies of pseudo independent states, with the lure of a small but steady income.
April 13, 2015 / The Independent
Matt Kennard, Claire Provost
There is growing concern that Burma’s economic metamorphosis has far outpaced its transition to democracy.
April 9, 2015 / The Irrawaddy
Spike Johnson
Burma’s army has forcibly recruited teenagers for decades. The practice is slowly changing, but many former child soldiers live with the scars of their experiences.
April 7, 2015 / The Guardian
Matt Kennard, Claire Provost
The purpose-built city of Naypyidaw—unveiled a decade ago this year–boasts 20-lane highways, golf courses, fast Wi-Fi and reliable electricity. The only thing it doesn’t seem to have is people.
March 19, 2015 / The Washington Post
Spike Johnson
Lured off the streets by false promises and recruited into the army as young boys, they returned home as men years later.
March 9, 2015
Spike Johnson
Spike Johnson explores humanitarian themes through documentary photography. His current body of work focuses on the Myanmar Army’s release of its forcibly recruited child soldiers.
March 3, 2015 / VICE News
Spike Johnson
In Burma the use of child soldiers is commonplace, but under increasing international pressure small numbers are being released from service, returning to parents who thought them dead.
March 3, 2015
Spike Johnson
In Myanmar the use of child soldiers remains commonplace but under increasing international pressure small numbers of them are being released from service, returning to parents who thought them dead.
June 17, 2014 / Time
Jason Motlagh
Confined to squalid camps, supposedly for their own "protection," Burma's persecuted Rohingya are slowly succumbing to starvation, despair and disease. Some are calling it a crime against humanity.

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