January 10, 2017 / WNYC Radio
Malia Politzer, Emily Kassie
Journalists Malia Politzer and Emily Kassie discuss their project in the HuffingtonPost Highline, “The 21st Century Gold Rush: How the refugee crisis is changing the world economy."
At least 19 Syrian child refugees have died in Turkish factories since 2013. Image by Emily Kassie. Turkey, 2016.
December 27, 2016 /
Tom Hundley
This week: how the refugee crisis changes the world economy, migrants search for their children, and Pulitzer Center staff picks for a year in photos.
December 24, 2016 / The John Batchelor Show
Malia Politzer, Emily Kassie
Refugees who aren’t granted asylum in Italy usually end up staying anyway despite widespread joblessness. Benefitting from the instability is the Sicilian Mafia, otherwise known as Cosa Nostra.
Food, beds, pillows—those are luxuries in the ghettos of Agadez. Image by Emily Kassie. Niger, 2016.
December 23, 2016 / Huffington Post
Malia Politzer, Emily Kassie
These are the stories of the CEOs, criminal masterminds, pencil-pushers and low-flying vultures who have figured out how to profit from global instability, also known as human suffering.
Image by Emily Kassie. Turkey, 2016.
December 23, 2016
Malia Politzer, Emily Kassie
From smugglers in Agadez, to factory owners in Turkey, to the Italian and Nigerian mafias in Italy, and small business owners in Greece, people making a killing off the global migrant crisis.
candoni camp
September 17, 2016 / Untold Stories
Holly Gambrell
In Candoni, a Roma camp, five Roma women are breaking out of their traditional roles to start their own business in hopes of bettering their futures.
September 17, 2016 / Untold Stories
Holly Gambrell
The Roma have been discriminated against in Italy from the time they first arrived in the country in 1400 to the present day. Will the Italian government's plan for inclusion help matters?
September 14, 2016 / Untold Stories
Holly Gambrell
Every day in Italy, the Roma face challenges of prejudice, poverty and unemployment. Their story serves as a lesson and warning for refugees entering Italy's borders.
Image by Holly Gambrell. Italy, 2016.
September 14, 2016
Holly Gambrell
This investigation into the lifestyles, struggles and cultures of the Roma people living in Rome examines how the Italian government—and citizens—treat the Roma population.
Boat wreck in Milazzo, Italy. Image courtesy of Sarah Tzinieris. Italy, 2015.
September 7, 2016 / The Guardian
Claire Provost
Ventimiglia is feeling the impact of heavier French border controls and deterrent measures, but the tension masks a wider humanitarian issue.
July 22, 2016 / Untold Stories
Amanda Ulrich
Rome is a city deeply attached to its long-held traditions and uniquely Italian way of life. What happens when new people, languages and religions make Italy’s capital their own?
The Joel Nafuma Refugee Center in Rome
July 21, 2016 / Untold Stories
Amanda Ulrich
Headlines about the European refugee crisis have become so commonplace that the issue has almost lost its shock value. Understanding one person’s story suddenly brings the crisis very close to home.
Armed guards stand watch outside of the Basilica of Santa Maria, one of the oldest churches in Rome. After the terrorist attacks in Paris and Brussels, soldiers have been stationed all over the city in tourist-centric areas: in front of government buildings, piazzas and even university campuses. Image by Amanda Ulrich. Italy, 2016.
July 17, 2016 / Untold Stories
Amanda Ulrich
Refugees who make it to Rome are entering an environment they weren’t necessarily expecting: one that’s heavily polarized politically and full of distrust.

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