February 10, 2016 / Untold Stories
Rhitu Chatterjee
Brazil’s school feeding program is considered one of the best in the world. Journalist Rhitu Chatterjee was prepared to be impressed, but she didn't expect such high quality and care.
February 10, 2016 / Untold Stories
Rhitu Chatterjee
Soda or fresh fruit? Brazil's school feeding program began as a way to reduce hunger and malnutrition. But today, the program helps tackle obesity by encouraging children to "eat healthy."
February 10, 2016 /
Rhitu Chatterjee
Brazil’s school feeding program feeds 45 million children. Besides fighting hunger, it is also changing kids’ understanding of food and nutrition, while supporting millions of local farmers.
February 10, 2016 / Untold Stories
Rhitu Chatterjee
Brazil is a global agricultural powerhouse, exporting products like coffee, cane sugar, orange juice and beef. But 70 percent of what Brazilians eat is grown by small family farmers.
Santiago Calatrava's Museu do Amanhã, or Museum of Tomorrow.
December 18, 2015 / The Atlantic's Citylab
Matthew Niederhauser, John Fitzgerald
Santiago Calatrava’s dramatic design for The Museum of Tomorrow sets new standards for sustainable architecture. But it is also a massive symbol of deepening socioeconomic divides.
October 28, 2015 / The Atlantic's Citylab
Matthew Niederhauser
Brazil’s Homeless Workers’ Movement stages occupations to protest rising corruption and inequality in South America’s biggest city.
September 11, 2015 / The Atlantic's Citylab
Matthew Niederhauser, John Fitzgerald
Those in greatest need of basic amenities are nowhere near the biggest infrastructure investments being made in preparation for the 2016 Olympic Games.
July 15, 2015 / The Davidson International
Daniel Black
A corruption scandal is toppling Brazil's political and economic elite. Angola is left to deal with the mess.
June 18, 2015
Heather Pringle
Pulitzer Center grantees Heather Pringle and Andrew Lawler traveled to the Amazon to report on isolated indigenous peoples' recent emergence from the forests.
June 15, 2015
Lauren Shepherd, Andrew Lawler, Heather Pringle
'From Paradise to Peril: The Amazon's Isolated Tribes' Science series sparks global conversation among several outlets about what happens and what needs to be done when cultures collide.
June 12, 2015 / Science Magazine
Heather Pringle
Heather Pringle explains the history of contact between European and indigenous Mexicans, Central Americans, and South Americans, tracking the historical spread of disease and warfare.
June 4, 2015 / Science Magazine
Heather Pringle
As encounters with indigenous Amazonian peoples in Brazil grow more frequent, Brazil's National Indian Foundation (FUNAI) and the Brazilian Government work to ensure these groups' survival and health...
June 4, 2015 / Science Magazine
Heather Pringle
Brazil's former "attraction fronts" initiated contact with indigenous tribes like the Nambikwara, but anthropologists today describe this tactic as genocide.

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