Issue

Climate Change

Earth's average temperature has risen approximately one degree Fahrenheit in the last fifty years. By the end of this century, it will be several degrees higher, according to the latest climate research.

But global warming is doing more than simply making things a little warmer. It's changing rainfall, causing heat waves, and making sea level rise, all of which create human suffering.

Climate Change brings together reporting from Pulitzer Center grantees on the abilities of communities in diverse regions to bounce back and adapt to impacts of climate change: One highlight includes in-depth reporting on global warming in France, southern Africa, Bangladesh, and India, produced by Daniel Grossman in partnership with WBUR.

Our journalists investigate climate change in the Arctic—the effects on indigenous communities, the destruction of the fragile natural environment, and the conflict between humans and polar bears. One interactive, award-winning multimedia project, "Sea Change," looks at ocean acidification, its impact on fishing, people's livelihoods, and food security. The documentary "Easy Like Water" features a solar-powered school boat in Bangladesh, where flooding may create 20 million "climate refugees" by mid-century.

Other topics covered here range from the future of the residents of Kiribati, a low-lying island nation in the Pacific, to the biological diversity of the rainforest in Peru, and the psychological effects of climate change on the inhabitants of Australia and Fiji.

 

Climate Change

Burning Forest for the Trees

In the name of renewable energy, the British government is subsidizing the clear-cutting of the American Southeast.

IN PHOTOS: No Man's Land

Palm oil is a multibillion-dollar industry for Indonesia. But the people responsible for its production are not the ones reaping the riches.

In Morona Santiago, Deforestation Exists Alongside Poverty and Cultural Change

Forged documents, cloned trucks, and bribes are some of the methods used by the illegal loggers in Ecuador’s Morona Santiago province to extract timber from the rainforest which the Shuar nation struggle to protect. Government mining concessions to their land have led to evictions and leaders being sued for protesting.

Meet the Journalist: Eli Kintisch

Eli Kintisch wrote and produced THAW, a documentary series that tells the story of a journey to the Arctic ocean in the dead of winter, revealing a radically changing ecosystem with global implications.

Meet the Journalist: Sam Eaton

Environmental journalist Sam Eaton discusses his deep dive reporting trip along Brazil’s violent “arc of deforestation” to explore the crucial question: Can we save the Amazon, so it can help save us?

Meet the Journalist: Roxanne Scott

In 1960, about 100,000 turkeys in England suddenly died. Could grain contamination be the cause? Roxanne Scott explores how Nigerian farmers are planning to recover from aflatoxin contamination.

Meet the Journalist: Amy Martin

Threshold is a public radio show and podcast tackling one pressing environmental issue each season. The show aims to be a home for nuanced journalism about human relationships with the natural world.

Watch Now: Tools and Tips for Cross-Border Data Journalism Projects

Watch Jacopo Ottaviani and the Pulitzer Center's Steve Sapienza discuss the growing use of data journalism in Africa's newsrooms, tips for organizing cross-border collaborations, and how civic technology capacity is influencing the use of open data and open governments in certain African countries.