Issue

Climate Change

Earth's average temperature has risen approximately one degree Fahrenheit in the last fifty years. By the end of this century, it will be several degrees higher, according to the latest climate research.

But global warming is doing more than simply making things a little warmer. It's changing rainfall, causing heat waves, and making sea level rise, all of which create human suffering.

Climate Change brings together reporting from Pulitzer Center grantees on the abilities of communities in diverse regions to bounce back and adapt to impacts of climate change: One highlight includes in-depth reporting on global warming in France, southern Africa, Bangladesh, and India, produced by Daniel Grossman in partnership with WBUR.

Our journalists investigate climate change in the Arctic—the effects on indigenous communities, the destruction of the fragile natural environment, and the conflict between humans and polar bears. One interactive, award-winning multimedia project, "Sea Change," looks at ocean acidification, its impact on fishing, people's livelihoods, and food security. The documentary "Easy Like Water" features a solar-powered school boat in Bangladesh, where flooding may create 20 million "climate refugees" by mid-century.

Other topics covered here range from the future of the residents of Kiribati, a low-lying island nation in the Pacific, to the biological diversity of the rainforest in Peru, and the psychological effects of climate change on the inhabitants of Australia and Fiji.

 

Climate Change

December 22, 2014

Who Cares About Patagonia?

Katie Mathieson

Patagonia, a region shared by Argentina and Chile, is well known for its unparalled panoramic views, unblemished status and remoteness. What will be the impact of a mega-project for dam construction?

September 12, 2014

Venetian Artisanship and Climate Change

Robert Eric Shoemaker

Robert Eric Shoemaker presents a multimedia excavation of the artisans of Venice through the lens of climate change: a conversation between art and science.

July 30, 2014

Black Gold in the Cradle of Mankind

Jessica Hatcher, Marc Hofer, Guillaume Bonn

Turkana in Kenya’s arid north is the most important place you’ve likely never heard of, quintessential to understanding mankind. Now, Turkana has oil. Is it a pending resource-curse catastrophe?

June 09, 2014

The Big Picture: Alberta’s Oil Sands

Daniel Grossman, Alex MacLean

Alberta’s oil sands region is at the heart of the KeystoneXL pipeline controversy. A project built on aerial photographs from 1,000 feet up brings into sharp focus the project's scale—and stakes.

Exotic Pet Owners of Beijing

Portraits of Beijing's exotic pet owners and their animals reveals the extent of a new growing industry that experts believe is contributing to biodiversity loss across the world.

This Week: Cambodia's Murdered Journalists

Cambodian journalists facing violent retribution, the work of a Chinese activist and documentary filmmaker, and what deployment to Iraq meant for New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina.