Issue

Climate Change

Earth's average temperature has risen approximately one degree Fahrenheit in the last fifty years. By the end of this century, it will be several degrees higher, according to the latest climate research.

But global warming is doing more than simply making things a little warmer. It's changing rainfall, causing heat waves, and making sea level rise, all of which create human suffering.

Climate Change brings together reporting from Pulitzer Center grantees on the abilities of communities in diverse regions to bounce back and adapt to impacts of climate change: One highlight includes in-depth reporting on global warming in France, southern Africa, Bangladesh, and India, produced by Daniel Grossman in partnership with WBUR.

Our journalists investigate climate change in the Arctic—the effects on indigenous communities, the destruction of the fragile natural environment, and the conflict between humans and polar bears. One interactive, award-winning multimedia project, "Sea Change," looks at ocean acidification, its impact on fishing, people's livelihoods, and food security. The documentary "Easy Like Water" features a solar-powered school boat in Bangladesh, where flooding may create 20 million "climate refugees" by mid-century.

Other topics covered here range from the future of the residents of Kiribati, a low-lying island nation in the Pacific, to the biological diversity of the rainforest in Peru, and the psychological effects of climate change on the inhabitants of Australia and Fiji.

 

Climate Change

August 30, 2016

Solar Oven Use in the Dominican Republic

Makenzie Huber

Unreliable access to electricity and ever-increasing prices for gas keep almost half of the Dominican Republic from escaping poverty. Some communities are turning to solar cooking as a solution.

June 14, 2016

Can Palm Oil Ever Be Grown Sustainably?

Wudan Yan

Palm oil—a product that appears in candy bars, cereal, and cosmetics—is a product the world needs. But can it be produced in an environmentally and socially sustainable manner?

April 24, 2016

Nepal's Ticking Timebomb

Jane Qiu

The legacy of the 2015 Gorkha earthquake in Nepal could last for decades. Scientists begin to understand why the badly shaken landscape is prone to landslides, especially during monsoons.

Meet the Journalist: Sam Knight

The UN is trying to bring forests into the fight against climate change with an ambitious programme known as REDD+. Can it work in a complex place like Papua New Guinea?

Meet the Journalist: Justin Catanoso

Pope Francis encounters the limits of his moral authority in Latin America, where his encyclical on climate change and environmental protection is met with scorn from those who need to be influenced.