Issue

Climate Change

Earth's average temperature has risen approximately one degree Fahrenheit in the last fifty years. By the end of this century, it will be several degrees higher, according to the latest climate research.

But global warming is doing more than simply making things a little warmer. It's changing rainfall, causing heat waves, and making sea level rise, all of which create human suffering.

Climate Change brings together reporting from Pulitzer Center grantees on the abilities of communities in diverse regions to bounce back and adapt to impacts of climate change: One highlight includes in-depth reporting on global warming in France, southern Africa, Bangladesh, and India, produced by Daniel Grossman in partnership with WBUR.

Our journalists investigate climate change in the Arctic—the effects on indigenous communities, the destruction of the fragile natural environment, and the conflict between humans and polar bears. One interactive, award-winning multimedia project, "Sea Change," looks at ocean acidification, its impact on fishing, people's livelihoods, and food security. The documentary "Easy Like Water" features a solar-powered school boat in Bangladesh, where flooding may create 20 million "climate refugees" by mid-century.

Other topics covered here range from the future of the residents of Kiribati, a low-lying island nation in the Pacific, to the biological diversity of the rainforest in Peru, and the psychological effects of climate change on the inhabitants of Australia and Fiji.

 

Climate Change

April 11, 2018

THAW: Into the Deep, Dark Arctic

Eli Kintisch

As the ice vanishes, will the Arctic die? Aboard the Norwegian research vessel Helmer Hanssen, Eli Kintisch explores the mystical Arctic ocean during Polar Night, and finds surprising answers.

March 05, 2018

In Hot Water: God, Oil, and Peru’s Boiling River

Natalie Hutchison

In the sleepy Peruvian rainforest hides an aquatic anomaly, protected by a shaman and for centuries thought only a legend. Explore how native cosmology is helping protect it from climate change.

February 01, 2018

Can the Polders of Bangladesh Be Saved?

Warren Cornwall, Tanmoy Bhaduri

In the 1960s, Bangladesh walled off parts of its coast to stop flooding and create farmland. Today that land is afflicted with chronic flooding, due to these very walls. Can the problem be solved?

December 01, 2017

Manipur: Where the Islands Float

Neeta Satam

The floating islands of Loktak Lake, known as “phumdis,” are home to unique animals and plants and an indigenous community—and are threatened by development.

How Cape Town Defeated Day Zero—for Now

Reporting from Cape Town, South Africa, Jacqueline Flynn explores the reality of living with Level 6 water restrictions and the little changes that made the biggest difference for Capetonians during the water crisis.

Cape Town Water Crisis: A Timeline

What were the first signs of a looming water crisis in Cape Town? What restrictions were placed on residents? And how did Capetonians reduce their water consumption?

Cape Town: Signs of the Water Crisis

For months, street corners, buildings, and bathroom mirrors served as constant reminders for Capetonians of the looming threat of the water crisis and suggested new ways to save water.

The Unseen Reality of Air Pollution

The most dangerous effects of air pollution often go unseen. The city of London has implemented numerous measures to mitigate rising air pollution. But, has it done enough?

Meet the Journalist: Bukola Adebayo

Bukola Adebayo discusses the environmental impact of sand dredging along Lagos coastlines, the socio-economic challenges, and the relationship to violations of land and property rights.

Meet the Journalist: Kai Schultz

Kai Schultz reports from the Maldives on its transition to democracy, the misappropriation of tourist taxes, safety at resorts, and the growing fear of Islamic radicalization.

Meet the Journalist: Fred Pearce

200 environmental and human rights activists are assassinated each year, according to Global Witness. Fred Pearce investigates the headline-grabbing slayings of three of these activists.

Where Can I Be Safe?

A 12-year old girl questions the fate of the earth at the August 1 launch of the NYT Magazine article, "Losing Earth," by author Nathaniel Rich, at The Times Center in New York.

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