Issue

Climate Change

Earth's average temperature has risen approximately one degree Fahrenheit in the last fifty years. By the end of this century, it will be several degrees higher, according to the latest climate research.

But global warming is doing more than simply making things a little warmer. It's changing rainfall, causing heat waves, and making sea level rise, all of which create human suffering.

Climate Change brings together reporting from Pulitzer Center grantees on the abilities of communities in diverse regions to bounce back and adapt to impacts of climate change: One highlight includes in-depth reporting on global warming in France, southern Africa, Bangladesh, and India, produced by Daniel Grossman in partnership with WBUR.

Our journalists investigate climate change in the Arctic—the effects on indigenous communities, the destruction of the fragile natural environment, and the conflict between humans and polar bears. One interactive, award-winning multimedia project, "Sea Change," looks at ocean acidification, its impact on fishing, people's livelihoods, and food security. The documentary "Easy Like Water" features a solar-powered school boat in Bangladesh, where flooding may create 20 million "climate refugees" by mid-century.

Other topics covered here range from the future of the residents of Kiribati, a low-lying island nation in the Pacific, to the biological diversity of the rainforest in Peru, and the psychological effects of climate change on the inhabitants of Australia and Fiji.

 

Climate Change

November 22, 2017

100 Days in the Arctic

Amy Martin

Season two of Threshold takes listeners to the homes, hunting grounds, and melting coastlines of Arctic peoples, where climate change isn’t an abstract concept, but a part of daily life.

October 18, 2017

Puerto Rico: Crisis in the Caribbean

Ryan Michalesko

Weeks after Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico, the island continues its battle for food, water and electricity. Ryan Michalesko reports on the fate of this U.S. territory and its people.

October 12, 2017

Climate Change and Sheepherding in Algeria

Yasmin Bendaas

Although Algeria is a low emitter of greenhouse gasses, environmental changes like lower rainfall, higher temperatures, and longer cycles of drought have slashed profits for Algerian sheepherders.

September 19, 2017

Harvey Aftermath

Alex MacLean, Daniel Grossman

Hurricane Harvey caused unprecedented flooding of the U.S. Gulf Coast. Alex MacLean and Daniel Grossman fly over the region to report on the damage and seek lessons for better storm resilience.

August 23, 2017

The Cookstove Conundrum

Michelle Nijhuis, Lynn Johnson

Nearly half the people on earth use open fires to cook their food and heat their homes, and the price they pay is steep. But changing the world's kitchens is surprisingly complicated.

Lessons from Hurricane Harvey

In August 2017 Hurricane Harvey flooded Houston. With predicted increases in extreme weather events, city planners across the globe are faced with the task of working with, rather than against, nature.

Loktak Wetland

The floating islands of Loktak Lake, known as “phumdis,” home to unique animals and plants and an indigenous community, are threatened by development, climate change, and conflict.

Meet the Journalist: Kai Schultz

Kai Schultz reports from the Maldives on its transition to democracy, the misappropriation of tourist taxes, safety at resorts, and the growing fear of Islamic radicalization.

Meet the Journalist: Fred Pearce

200 environmental and human rights activists are assassinated each year, according to Global Witness. Fred Pearce investigates the headline-grabbing slayings of three of these activists.

Meet the Journalist: Wudan Yan

Palm oil has been condemned for rampant deforestation in Southeast Asia. How can the world produce more of it in a more sustainable manner? Journalist Wudan Yan investigated in Fall 2016.