Image by Tim Rogers. Nicaragua, 2012.

If veteran Latin America correspondent Tim Roger’s stories sound faintly familiar, it’s probably because the cast of characters has not changed much from the Reagan administration days. Danny Ortega is still El Presidente, the contras still go by their old noms de guerre and they still seem to have powerful and mysterious connections in Miami. In a unique partnership between the Pulitzer Center and GlobalPost, Tim’s “Nicaragua Rewind” project is taking a long, in-depth look at how Nicaragua’s economy is flourishing while democratic reforms go by the board. In his latest dispatch, Tim tries to track down a group of reconstituted contras—“recontras”—who say they are again preparing to take up arms against Ortega.

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Earlier this year Pulitzer Center grantees Peter DiCampo and Austin Merrill traveled to Ivory Coast to look into the root causes of that county’s recent civil war. War is often the reason correspondents travel to Africa. But Peter and Austin paused along the way to capture another side of Africa. Using their iPhones, the pair photographed the ordinary, the routine, the normal. “Everyday Africa” has been published by Bloomberg/Businessweek.

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Dan Grossman, a frequent Pulitzer Center collaborator, has produced a new digital book, “Deep Water,” that vividly illustrates the debate on global warming and rising sea levels. Published by TED Books, it is available via Amazon.com, Apple’s iBookstore and Barnes & Noble online. While you are shopping, check out iTunes and the Pulitzer Center's first two iBooks: “In Search of Home” by Greg Constantine and Stephanie Hanes and “Voices of Haiti” by Lisa Armstrong, Kwame Dawes and Andre Lambertson.

Until next week,

Tom Hundley
Senior Editor