Pulitzer Center Update

This Week: Pakistan and India are Becoming Nuclear Rivals

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Illustration by Javier Zarracina. Image courtesy of Vox.

Illustration by Javier Zarracina. Image courtesy of Vox.

Nuclear Brinksmanship in South Asia

Tom Hundley

The Pakistan navy is likely to soon place nuclear-tipped cruise missiles on up to three of its submarines and might also put nuclear missiles on surface vessels. This follows India's 2016 deployment of its first nuclear submarine, and the promise of at least five more to come. India and Pakistan have gone to war with each other four times since independence in 1947. And as the Pulitzer Center’s Tom Hundley reports for Vox, the new generation of Indian and Pakistani nuclear-armed submarines increases the risk of an even more devastating conflict to come.

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Playing xiangqi on the porch of a floating house in the village of Chhnok Trou. Image by Andrea Frazzetta. Cambodia, 2018.

Playing xiangqi on the porch of a floating house in the village of Chhnok Trou. Image by Andrea Frazzetta. Cambodia, 2018.

Hatred and Oppression on the Mekong

Ben Mauk

Despite living in Cambodia for generations, ethnic Vietnamese cannot attend public schools or open bank accounts, get driver’s licenses or factory jobs, own land or property. As Ben Mauk reports for The New York Times, they are arguably one of the largest and least-supported stateless populations in the world.

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Women walk past a U.N. vehicle at the entrance to the sprawling camp in Kaga-Bandoro for thousands of families displaced by civil conflict. Image by Jack Losh. Central African Republic, 2018.

Women walk past a U.N. vehicle at the entrance to the sprawling camp in Kaga-Bandoro for thousands of families displaced by civil conflict. Image by Jack Losh. Central African Republic, 2018.

Rebels in the Central African Republic Are Filling the Void of an Absent Government

Jack Losh

The Central African Republic’s Western-backed government is toothless and unable to exert much authority. As Jack Losh reports for The Washington Post, armed groups have filled the void, running customs, charging taxes, giving out fines—and battling among themselves for power and spoils. 

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