Pulitzer Center Update

This Week: How Despair Drives Young Ethiopians to Flee to Yemen

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Ethiopians at the IOM transit centre in Obock, Djibouti, waiting to return home. People on the road to Obock told the Guardian that friends had perished en route. Image by Charlie Rosser. Djibouti, 2018.

Ethiopians at the IOM transit centre in Obock, Djibouti, waiting to return home. People on the road to Obock told the Guardian that friends had perished en route. Image by Charlie Rosser. Djibouti, 2018. 

Fleeing Toward A War Zone
Tom Gardner and Charlie Rosser

The desperate journeys by African migrants trying to cross the Mediterranean to Europe have become well known. Less known are the tens of thousands who cross the Red Sea to the Arabian Peninsula each year. As Tom Gardner and Charlie Rosser report for The Guardian, Ethiopians trek through some of the most inhospitable terrain on earth to reach Djibouti, in hopes then of making the perilous journey to war-ravaged Yemen and eventually on to Saudi Arabia. Many die in the desert or drown at sea. Those who do make it often suffer sexual abuse, abduction, extortion, torture or forced labor by smugglers and criminal networks.

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The headquarters of Britain's electronic spying agency, GCHQ, in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. Image by Matt Kennard. England, 2018.

The headquarters of Britain's electronic spying agency, GCHQ, in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. Image by Matt Kennard. England, 2018.

 
Many quaint English towns, known for their farming and country pubs, have seen an influx of companies dealing in cybersecurity and electronic spying. As Matt Kennard reports for The Intercept, the firms often work closely with the United Kingdom's main surveillance agency.

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Screenshot from PBS NewsHour. Kosovo, 2018.

Screenshot from PBS NewsHour. Kosovo, 2018.

Malcolm Brabant
 
Nearly 20 years after the war in Kosovo, efforts to achieve reconciliation between Serbs and ethnic Albanians have suffered one of their worst setbacks in recent years, reports Malcolm Brabant for the PBS NewsHour.