Pulitzer Center Update

This Week: China's Strategic Investment in Africa

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In the Chinese-owned Huajian Shoe Co. Factory in Addis Ababa, more than 6,000 workers build shoes for American brands such Tommy, Guess and Lucky. Image by Noah Fowler. Ethiopia, 2017.

In the Chinese-owned Huajian Shoe Co. Factory in Addis Ababa, more than 6,000 workers build shoes for American brands such Tommy, Guess and Lucky. Image by Noah Fowler. Ethiopia, 2017.

Africa's China Moment

Jon Kaiman and Noah Fowler

In a multi-part series for the Los Angeles Times, grantees Jon Kaiman and Noah Fowler explore the implications of China’s growing “soft power” across the African continent. Massive Chinese investment in highways, rail links, and ports—all constructed by state-owned companies—holds the promise of profits and influence for Beijing. “The Chinese march through Africa has come as U.S. engagement on the continent has been dialed down to its lowest level in years,” writes Jon. “President Trump has barely mentioned Africa in his public statements, and his ‘America first’ rhetoric, some Africa experts say, is pushing the continent further into China’s embrace.”

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A physician checks on Ibrahim Hassan (left), who lives as a displaced person in Jordan after fleeing the regime in Syria. Image by Neil Brandvold. Jordan, 2017.

A physician checks on Ibrahim Hassan (left), who lives as a displaced person in Jordan after fleeing the regime in Syria. Image by Neil Brandvold. Jordan, 2017.

War Is Bad for Your Health

Amy Maxmen

With ongoing wars in Syria and Iraq, it’s no surprise that violent deaths are on the rise, but the region has also seen a spike in deaths related to chronic disease. Grantee Amy Maxmen explains why—and what health officials are doing to cope.

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The view from the Amazonian Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO), the tallest tower south of the Rio Grande, 1,000 feet in the air, 100 miles NE of Manaus. Image by Dan Grossman. Brazil, 2016.

The view from the Amazonian Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO), the tallest tower south of the Rio Grande, 1,000 feet in the air, 100 miles NE of Manaus. Image by Dan Grossman. Brazil, 2016.

The Scientific Method

Dan Grossman

Grantee Dan Grossman, whose work focuses on global warming, offers his unique take on the art of science reporting in this wide-ranging interview with Labocine.

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