Pulitzer Center Update

This Week: DEA Killings Exposed

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Rio Tapalwas, a tributary of the Rio Rus Rus, Reserva Biologica Rus Rus, Dept. Gracias a Dios, Honduras. 2003. Image by Josiah Townsend / flickr commons.

Rio Tapalwas, a tributary of the Rio Rus Rus, Reserva Biologica Rus Rus, Dept. Gracias a Dios, Honduras. 2003. Image by Josiah Townsend / flickr commons.

Uncovering a Cover-Up

Matt Schwartz

In 2014, grantee Matt Schwartz wrote a long piece for The New Yorker that disputed the Drug Enforcement Administration’s account of an incident on a remote Honduras river that left four people dead. The DEA told Congress the dead were drug traffickers. But a 424-page report released last month by the State and Justice Departments corroborates Matt’s findings. “The dead,” said Matt, “were apparently civilians who had the misfortune of being on a commercial passenger boat heading upriver, in the middle of the night, at the same moment that six members of the DEA-led team were trying to recover a second boat that was loaded with cocaine.”

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Maykel Molina Gutiérrez delivers El Paquete to a customer during his weekly round. Image by Alexa Hoyer. Cuba.

Maykel Molina Gutiérrez delivers El Paquete to a customer during his weekly round. Image by Alexa Hoyer. Cuba.

Online in Cuba

Kim Wall

How do Cubans keep up with the Kardashians? In an Internet-starved country, it takes some ingenuity. Grantee Kim Wall explains how in this Letter from Havana in Harper’s.

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A resort near Male, the capital of the Maldives, where growing Islamic radicalization has highlighted security concerns at resorts. Image by Kai Schultz. Maldives, 2017.

A resort near Male, the capital of the Maldives, where growing Islamic radicalization has highlighted security concerns at resorts. Image by Kai Schultz. Maldives, 2017.

Radicals in Paradise

Kai Schultz

Radical Islam and Western tourism have been able to co-exist on the Maldives—so far. But grantee Kai Schultz reports in The New York Times, that the Indian Ocean island paradise, heavily dependent on tourist dollars, is increasingly nervous about security.