A screenshot from the Pulitzer Center's newly published iBook "In Search of Home." 2012.
The cover of the Pulitzer Center's newly published iBook "In Search of Home." 2012.
A screenshot from the Pulitzer Center's newly published iBook "In Search of Home." 2012.
A screenshot from the Pulitzer Center's newly published iBook "In Search of Home." 2012.
A screenshot from the Pulitzer Center's newly published iBook "In Search of Home." 2012.

The Pulitzer Center is proud to announce the publication of its first multimedia e-book for iPad: “In Search of Home,” a multimedia exploration of statelessness that focuses on the Rohingya from Burma, the Nubians of Kenya, and people of Haitian descent living in the Dominican Republic.

The stateless are not refugees, or not exactly, as journalist Stephanie Hanes writes in the iTunes online preview of the e-book. Often they are living in their homes in a country they consider to be their own. Yet they are stateless—without the basic right to get an education, to work in the legal economy, receive health benefits, get married, vote or own property. The cause is often rooted in religion or ethnicity, but even when the stateless are not actively persecuted they remain vulnerable and at the margins of society.

“In Search of Home” features the stunning photography of Greg Constantine and eloquent essays by Stephanie Hanes. Greg, based in Bangkok, has been reporting on this issue for six years, with support from organizations such as Refugees International, the Open Society Institute and the United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR), as well as the Pulitzer Center. Stephanie, the recipient of multiple Pulitzer Center grants, has reported from Africa and Latin America for the Baltimore Sun, the Christian Science Monitor, Smithsonian and other outlets.

This e-book stems from the Pulitzer Center project "Statelessness: A Human Rights Crisis," a reporting project by Hanes and Constantine that explores the world-wide phenomenon of statelessness by looking at how the international community is defining, and responding, to this human-rights crisis.

“In Search of Home” is part of a broader Pulitzer Center initiative, seeking out new platforms and partners to extend the work of journalists we support and to make use of the extraordinary presentation of multimedia material now possible on tablets and other mobile devices. “Afghanistan by Donkey,” Anna Badkhen’s book-length essay, was published earlier this year in partnership with Foreign Policy, which is also co-publishing a series of eBooks with the Pulitzer Center on borderlands around the world. Also in the works: eBook partnerships with Atavist on the drug wars of Southeast Asia and with TedX on climate change.

“In Search of Home” is the first of a series of e-books for iPad that the Pulitzer Center is publishing in house. Special thanks to Jake Naughton and Maura Youngman of our staff, for the beautiful design and interactive features, to editors Tom Hundley and Kem Knapp Sawyer, and to managing director Nathalie Applewhite. And thanks, especially, to journalists like Stephanie Hanes and Greg Constantine, who bring us the unforgettable images and insight that inform every page of “In Search of Home.”

Thirty percent of the $4.99 purchase price of these e-books goes to Apple. All the rest goes to the contributing journalists. We hope to make these books the capstone for the best of our projects, giving readers an immersive, narratively rich way of engaging the issues they cover. We believe these presentations will appeal to all audiences, and especially to the university and secondary-school students that have become a major focus of the Pulitzer Center’s work.

New platforms. New income for journalists. And new hope for sustained reporting on issues that matter. We hope you’ll take a look, buy the book, and make an investment in the future of journalism.

This book is available for purchase on your iPad with iBooks 2 or on your computer with iTunes.

PDN Photo District News highlighted "In Search of Home" on their blog on Monday, June 25th.

Project

From the slums of Nairobi to the sugar plantations of the Dominican Republic to the far reaches of Bangladesh, entire communities live without citizenship rights. They are “the stateless”.

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