The shaken landscape in Nepal could have a heightened level of landslides years or even decades after the devastating earthquake in 2015. Image by Kristen Cook. Nepal, 2015.
The shaken landscape in Nepal could have a heightened level of landslides years or even decades after the devastating earthquake in 2015. Image by Kristen Cook. Nepal, 2015. Add this image to a lesson

Pulitzer Center grantees Ari Daniel and Jane Qiu are winners of the 2016 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Kavli Science Journalism Awards for reporting made possible with funding from the Pulitzer Center.

Daniel won a Gold Award in the audio category for the Pulitzer Center-supported three-part series on PRI's The World, which took listeners to Greenland and the forefront of field research into glacial melting and climate change. As a Pulitzer Center grantee, Daniel worked with Peter Thomson, who shared the Gold Award. Thomson is the environment editor at PRI's The World. Their three award-winning pieces were: "Looking Small for Big Answers in Greenland," "In Greenland, a Climate Change Mystery with Clues Written in Water and Stone" and "Turning Ice into Fire. Iceland Goes for Drama."

Qiu won a Silver Award in the magazine category for a series of reporting as a freelancer for Nature including her examination of landslides in Nepal, "Listening for Landslides." The story was also part of a six-story package that helped her become the Merit Winner in the category of SEC‐CDL Environmental Journalist of the Year from the Asian Environmental Journalism Awards for 2016.

The AAAS Science Journalism Awards honor distinguished reporting on science by professional journalists and are an internationally recognized measure of excellence in science journalism. The award goes to individuals (rather than institutions, publishers or employers) for coverage of the sciences, engineering and mathematics. The association is the world’s largest general scientific society and publishes the journal Science, among others.

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The legacy of the 2015 Gorkha earthquake in Nepal could last for decades. Scientists begin to understand why the badly shaken landscape is prone to landslides, especially during monsoons.

Recently

Villagers rebuilding in Langtang, a popular tourist destination in northern Nepal where the 2015 earthquake triggered a monstrous avalanche and killed nearly 400 people, face uncertain future risks. Image by Jane Qiu. Nepal, 2016.
November 10, 2016 /
Jane Qiu
Pulitzer Center grantee honored for reporting on landslide-related reconstruction risks in post-earthquake Nepal.
Eavesdropping on landslides
April 28, 2016 / Nature
Jane Qiu
Grantee Jane Qiu speaks to Nature’s Adam Levy about how the effects of last year's earthquake in Nepal could be felt for years or even decades.