January 11, 2017 / WBUR
Dan Grossman
Global warming is heating things up, causing all sorts of problems — including for coffee growers. In northern Tanzania, growers are finding weather conditions increasingly unsuitable.
A young Syrian refugee packs tea boxes under a table in a Turkish factory near his refugee camp on the Turkey-Syria border.
January 10, 2017 / WNYC Radio
Malia Politzer, Emily Kassie
Journalists Malia Politzer and Emily Kassie discuss their project in the HuffingtonPost Highline, “The 21st Century Gold Rush: How the refugee crisis is changing the world economy."
Beyebo Eresado and a fellow villager describe how their community in southern Ethiopia stopped female genital mutilation. Image by Amy Yee. Ethiopia, 2016.
January 5, 2017 / Voice of America
Amy Yee
Attitudes toward female genital mutilation are slowly changing in Ethiopia.
December 24, 2016 / The John Batchelor Show
Malia Politzer, Emily Kassie
Refugees who aren’t granted asylum in Italy usually end up staying anyway despite widespread joblessness. Benefitting from the instability is the Sicilian Mafia, otherwise known as Cosa Nostra.
December 22, 2016 / Untold Stories
Kate Toporski
Since 1990, University of Michigan students have been facilitating fine arts workshops in local prisons. In 2016, they took to a global stage, exploring prison arts in Brazil.
Yassin Abuukar, Kowthar Adraman and Kamal Hassan at Moria refugee camp on Lesbos.  The three Somali journalists seek asylum in Euripe. Image by Jeanne Carstensen. Greece, 2016.
December 6, 2016 / PRI's The World
Jeanne Carstensen
Like many journalists in Somalia, they have been targeted by Al-Shabab. But despite the dangers they face at home, under the EU-Turkey agreement they face likely deportation back to Turkey.
December 5, 2016 / RadioWest | KUER-FM
Erik Vance
Radio West talked to grantee Erik Vance and a researcher at the University of Utah to better understand the effect of religion and healing in the brain.
Still image from PBS NewsHour. Image by Nick Schifrin and Zach Fannin. Cuba, 2016.
December 5, 2016 / NPR
Nick Schifrin
PBS NewsHour's Nick Schifrin was on hand as Cuba's longtime ruler Fidel Castro was buried in Santiago, where he launched his revolution more than half a century ago.
Rosalie Sewap attended the Guy Hill Indian Residential School (1959–1969)
December 1, 2016 / CBC Radio
Daniella Zalcman
Grantee Daniella Zalcman speaks with CBC Radio Saskatchewan about her new book "Signs of Your Identity."
A public park is seen from above in San Francisco. California is a major center for the development and manufacture of military UAVs–Genderal Atomic builds its Predators and Reapers in the state–and the Bay Area in particular is hub of the expanding consumer-drone market. Image by Tomas van Houtryve. United States, 2014.
November 20, 2016 / WFDD
Tomas van Houtryve
An art exhibit opening this week is providing a window to the atrocities of modern warfare from one hundred feet above.
Tana Wood and Aura Alonso-Rodriguez clear leaves off warming plot's heaters . Image by by Daniel Grossman. Puerto Rico, 2016.
November 18, 2016 / WBUR
Dan Grossman
We spew billions of tons of CO2 into the air. About half is absorbed by ocean water and plants, slowing warming. But this check on warming might slow. Scientists are heating forests to find out.
November 15, 2016 / The Four Hour Work Week
Erik Vance
Erik Vance visits the Tim Ferriss Show and discusses porcupines, pig manure and the power of belief in our lives.
Climate experts fear catastrophe unless the world grapples with global warming without delay. Image by Daniel Grossman. 2016.
November 11, 2016 / WBUR
Dan Grossman
Negotiators in Morocco are ironing out the details of the Paris climate agreement—and they're coming to grips with what a Trump presidency might mean for it.

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