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A World Apart

It was a day of connections in Liberia for Pulitzer Center grantee Ruthie Ackerman. She met with relatives of Liberians who fled the 14-year civil war and are trying to make a living in Staten Island.

Meet the Tuckers

Four Liberian brothers have grown up on opposite sides of the ocean — two in Staten Island and others in Liberia. But they prove that opportunities and challenges exist in both communities.

Peter and Jion: From Fighters to Friends

Two Liberian friends are former child soldiers who used to fight for opposing sides. Never formally demobilized, both live on the streets of Monrovia, begging for money and food to live.

From Nowhere to Somewhere

Junior Tucker is Isaiah and Kenje Tucker's brother. While his brothers live in Staten Island, Junior stays In Liberia, where he shares the story of difficulties living in the U.S.

We Could Have Died For Less...

Peter and Jion are two young men who are friends today but were former child soldiers who fought on opposing forces during the civil war. Jion lost his left leg, while Peter lost his right arm.

Why Iraq is Getting Worse

A new civil war between Shiites erupts within the old civil war between Sunnis and Shiites

A cloud of steam rises above the crowd in the 120-degree heat. As their leader approaches the podium, the thousands who have assembled meet him with pledges of their fealty.

The Eyes And Ears of Liberia

Most of the Liberian youth in Staten Island haven't been back to Liberia since they fled during the war. And all are curious as to what the country looks like now.

In Jail They Just Call Him Tucker

Kenje, a Liberian living in the U.S., was arrested for drug possession. Now, spending time in jail, Kenje says he doesn't want to be a drug dealer, but it's the easiest way to make some fast cash.

Philippines war on terror not as fierce

Isabela City is not Baghdad. Roadside bombs don't rip through the floors of humvees, nor do masked insurgents take pot shots at Kevlar-vested soldiers from bullet-riddled buildings.

But like Baghdad, there are American servicemen here. They've been helping Filipino soldiers fight al Qaeda-linked terrorists who have made the southern Philippine region of Mindanao a hotbed of extremist activity during the past decade.

And they're doing it without firing a shot - at least not outside their camp.

Trying to keep it all in the family dynasty

After weeks of vote counting, sporadic bombings and allegations of election fraud, the insurgency-racked island of Basilan in the southern Philippines finally has a new congressman. It also has a new governor and mayor of the provincial capital where al Qaeda-linked Abu Sayyaf terrorists once dined in local restaurants by day, and kidnapped priests and schoolteachers at night.

In a twist on the long Filipino tradition of dynastic rule, Basilan's new governor and the mayor of Isabela City are both married to congressman-elect Wahab Akbar.

Flood Ravaged Indians Founder in Undercurrent of Class Politics

MUZAFFARPUR, India - In the six weeks since their village was swallowed by floodwaters, Chaitu Sahani and his family have watched helplessly as the government aid deliveries roll past their new home.

Along with thousands of other refugees, they now live in shoddy tarpaulin tents that stretch for miles along one of the few highways still operable in the dirt-poor northern state of Bihar.

Why the food trucks won't stop, they don't understand.

Still Eating Tofu

Charles Lane discusses the role of Paraguay's soy bean production in the American and international market.