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A Retreat From Massacre

The T'boli-Dulangan Manobo, an indigenous group in the Philippines, lived peacefully in the village of Sitio Datalbonglangon—until the country's armed forces showed up.

Displacement in Sarawak

The Malaysian government has routinely put private-sector interests and infrastructure projects ahead of the livelihoods of indigenous people.

Last Resort

More than two centuries after settling in Honduras, the Garifuna people are still fighting for a place to raise their families.

After ISIS, Iraq Is Still Broken

One year after the liberation of Mosul, distrust, fear, and a paralyzing sense of insecurity plague the country’s religious and ethnic minorities.

Bosnia Prepares for First Post-War Census

A national census in Bosnia in October 2013 may reveal an increasingly ethnic Bosnian population, but getting minorities to officially declare their often-stigmatized identities will be difficult.

The Future of Xcel Energy in Colorado

Boulder, known for its green ideology, is preparing to take over the town's electrical utility in an effort to become more sustainable and bring the power of choice back to the public.

Capturing the ‘I’iwi

Hawaii's ‘i’iwi honeycreeper may not last another generation and its extinction would change the biological diversity and culture of the islands.

Does Congo Really Need Us?

Some of the biggest criticisms of international aid are coming from self-reflective aid workers who question their role and the role of their employers in developing nations.

Labor Policy in the 2012 Farm Bill

Every five years the federal government passes a Farm Bill to outline agriculture and food policy. This year, interest groups are trying to get a policy protecting farmworker rights included.

The Future of Democracy in China

Coming off of adventures in Asia during summer 2011, one traveler's questions shifted from whether China is ready for an Arab Spring to what the future of democracy looks like there.

This Week: Torture in Yemen's Prisons

Yemeni detainees being without charges decry abuse, the search for the Tasmanian tiger continues despite its supposed extinction, and the 2016 peace deal in Colombia has opened new areas to scientists.

This Week: Cracking the Indian Patriarchy

A poor school for girls in rural India reshapes the role of women, how Iraq's legal institutions are struggling to give closure to victims, and HIV's hold on Nigeria, Russia, and Florida.

Beyond War: The Rohingya: A Genocide On Our Watch?

At a Beyond War conference panel, journalists and Pulitzer Center grantees discuss their reporting on the Rohingya crisis while the former Ambassador to Burma explained attempts by the United States to curb the persecution.

Beyond War Conference Highlights

Journalists and youth activists took center stage at the Beyond War Conference, sharing their vision for what it means to maintain journalistic integrity in times of peacebuilding and conflict.