December 18, 2014 / Nature
Erika Check Hayden
A frontline report from Sierra Leone examines efforts to change hearts and minds in West Africa’s villages.
December 18, 2014 / The New Yorker
Jenna Krajeski
In the power struggle between Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan and exiled imam Fethullah Gülen, the first casualty has been freedom of the press.
December 16, 2014 / Untold Stories
Dimiter Kenarov
Georgii, a resident of Crimea, struggled with drug addiction for years before finding a solution in opioid substitution therapy (OST). But when Russia annexed the peninsula, it dismantled the program...
November 1, 2014 / The Rotarian
Roger Thurow
A child’s future well-being is determined by age two. What his mother knows can improve his chances.
October 30, 2014 / Business Insider
Jeremy Relph, Dominic Bracco II
"In an effort to understand what life is like in the world's murder capital, we spent two weeks in San Pedro Sula. We found a city in crisis, but also a place steeped in hope...."
October 30, 2014 / Foreign Policy
Caryle Murphy
In Saudi Arabia, a new generation is pushing back against the government’s embrace of fundamentalism. But is the kingdom ready for nonbelievers?
October 29, 2014 / The Ecologist
Dimiter Kenarov
With 300,000 hectares of forests, fields and steppes damaged by fire, the war in Ukraine has done huge damage to the country's environment. But there has been an upside: a new green spirit.
October 29, 2014 / The Nation
Dimiter Kenarov
Climate change is destroying Odessa’s famed Kuyalnik Estuary, where health tourists and war refugees live side by side.
October 24, 2014 / The New Yorker
Jason Larkin
Pulitzer Center grantee Jason Larkin traveled to Marikana, South Africa, to follow up on the 2012 massacre that left 34 striking miners dead at the hands of government security forces.
October 23, 2014 / Untold Stories
Emily Baumgaertner
Martin Palmer, founder of the Alliance of Religions and Conservation (ARC), charts the inter-connectivity between environmentalism and religion in China. Audio of interview with Jon Sawyer.
October 22, 2014 / Foreign Policy
Meg Jones
Thirteen years after Wisconsin’s 829th Engineer Co. deployed to build Afghanistan’s war infrastructure, they’re back to tear it apart and take it home.
October 21, 2014 / Harper's
James Harkin
How did a terror organization considered too bloody for Al Qaeda morph into something like a government with its own territory—and with troops at the border of a NATO member state?
October 20, 2014
Misha Friedman
The Crimean Peninsula’s annexation by Russia means a return to the shadows for LGBT people who now face public prosecution.

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