February 27, 2015 / The Atlantic's Citylab
Matthew Niederhauser
With its second annual Biennale, Dharavi finds itself being taken seriously as an arts destination.
February 26, 2015 / Foreign Policy
Caryle Murphy
Is King Salman's new court a breath of fresh air—or is it reactionaries looking to take the country back in time?
February 26, 2015 / Monocle
George Butler
George Butler's ink-and-watercolour scenes bring a new depth to reportage more often the preserve of combat photographers.
January 8, 2015 / The Guardian | Global Development
Sara Shahriari
Shelters, legal aid and lessons on economic self-sufficiency are helping to tackle rampant gender-based violence.
January 7, 2015 / Channel 4
Callum Macrae
Sri Lankan President Mahinda Rajapaksa, is engaged in a desperate fight for his political life in an election which just a few months ago seemed to be his for the taking.
January 7, 2015 / Newsweek
Jessica Hatcher
Gone are the days of gushers – we’re coaxing out glue, and struggling to move it after that. With oil prices crashing, are oil companies going to regret going after East Africa's waxy crude?
January 6, 2015 / VQR
Dimiter Kenarov, Boryana Katsarova
Two performances seem to be taking place in parallel: one inside the theater with actors, and another in the streets outside with soldiers in green balaclavas and no recognizable insignia.
January 5, 2015 / ChinaFile
Leah Thompson, Yunfan Sun
Looking beyond Bishan Project, this map illustrates 50 "back-to-the-land" efforts across China.
January 5, 2015 / Al Jazeera America
Amy Maxmen
A 17-year-old cares for Ebola orphans in Sierra Leone.
January 5, 2015 / Untold Stories
Jessie Li
The largest special education school in China contains state-of-the-art facilities, and many of its students have won national awards. Yet beneath its shiny infrastructure lies an uncertain future.
January 4, 2015 / The Ecologist
Dimiter Kenarov
In 1976 it looked like a good idea: divert the waters of the Danube into a salt-water lagoon on Ukraine's Black Sea coast. But the result has been a human and environmental disaster on an epic scale.
January 4, 2015 / Untold Stories
Jennifer Gonzalez, Luke Nozicka
In the mountainous regions of the Dominican Republic teen pregnancy is everywhere and mothers’ partners are commonly older.
January 4, 2015 / Untold Stories
Katie Mathieson
The most controversial conservationists on the continent, Doug and Kristine Tompkins, have dedicated their lives and capital to write the future for Patagonia, but their changes are not welcome.

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