March 24, 2015 / Yale Environment 360
Dan Grossman
For two towns in northern India, melting glaciers have had very different impacts—one town has benefited from flowing streams and bountiful harvests, but the other's water supply has dried up.
March 24, 2015 /
Amelia Warshaw, David Rochkind
Targeting care to poor and developing communities reduces stigma and deters development of drug-resistant strains of TB. Can a new diagnostic test be the turning point in the fight against TB?
March 24, 2015 / Slate
Jens Erik Gould, David Rochkind
Tuberculosis isn’t history, and it’s much more dangerous than malaria or Ebola.
February 22, 2015 / Untold Stories
Daniella Zalcman
An interview with LGBTI rights activist Jay Mulucha on life in Uganda after the Anti-Homosexuality Act was struck down.
February 22, 2015 / Untold Stories
Sara Shahriari, Noah Friedman-Rudovsky
Romance, love and jealousy become the motive and the justification for violence—preventing women from naming the aggressors, says a study on the coverage of violence in Bolivian media.
February 21, 2015 / Los Angeles Review of Books
Brian Castner, Cheryl Hatch
While Graham Greene smartly fretted about avoiding fever, we spent three weeks chasing it.
February 20, 2015 / Untold Stories
George Butler
Is drawing better than photography at recording the news?
February 20, 2015 / Untold Stories
Katherine Blunt
An increased demand for high-quality, certified coffee has changed the way it is grown in western Guatemala and improved the lives of those who pick and sell coffee cherries.
February 20, 2015 / Untold Stories
Jamie Walsh
In the UK, alcohol misuse is leading to health-related issues and is a major contributor to the high obesity rate. Deep historic roots are making it hard on officials to win this fight.
February 20, 2015 / Untold Stories
Katherine Blunt
A program committed to expanding economic opportunities for indigenous women in San Juan la Laguna has helped many artisans learn to sell their products online.
February 19, 2015 / Untold Stories
Ian Johnson, Sim Chi Yin
Living beneath Beijing's skyscrapers and residential blocks are an estimated 1 million migrant workers. Dubbed the "Rat Tribe," these low-wage workers make a home in windowless basement cubicles.
February 19, 2015 / GlobalPost
Dan Grossman
Alberta's Fort Chipewyan is experiencing an unusual incidence of a rare form of cancer. Its fish are showing up with odd deformities. Could these incidents be caused by the tar sands mines upstream?
February 19, 2015 / The Guardian
George Butler
These drawings show life a pace back from the violence of war: people washing, praying, working, suffering and laughing. It's a part of Afghanistan we are not always familiar with.

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