February 10, 2016 / Untold Stories
Rhitu Chatterjee
Brazil’s school feeding program is considered one of the best in the world. Journalist Rhitu Chatterjee was prepared to be impressed, but she didn't expect such high quality and care.
February 10, 2016 / Untold Stories
Rhitu Chatterjee
Soda or fresh fruit? Brazil's school feeding program began as a way to reduce hunger and malnutrition. But today, the program helps tackle obesity by encouraging children to "eat healthy."
February 10, 2016 / Untold Stories
Rhitu Chatterjee
Brazil is a global agricultural powerhouse, exporting products like coffee, cane sugar, orange juice and beef. But 70 percent of what Brazilians eat is grown by small family farmers.
Mao dolls are on sale in Taipei along with Chiang Kai-shek dolls, but the majority of the Taiwan population wants to keep the China of Mao at a distance. Image by Richard Bernstein. Taiwan, 2016.
January 14, 2016 / Foreign Policy
Richard Bernstein
Tsai Ing-wen looks like she's about to win the upcoming presidential election on Taiwan, and if she does, the one-China idea, so important to Beijing, will have suffered a stunning defeat.
January 14, 2016 / Untold Stories
Max Radwin
Chile is turning to small-scale energy projects to meet its energy needs, but are they creating new problems for local communities in the process?
January 14, 2016 / Yale Climate Connections
Dan Grossman
A veteran reporter on climate issues provides a glimpse into a corporate responsibility activist's efforts during the recent Paris climate conference.
January 13, 2016
Elana Dure
Daniel Pearl fellow Arooj Zahra publishes article on sensitive topic—gay marriage in the Muslim community for the Huffington Post.
January 13, 2016 / The New York Times
Ankita Rao, Atish Patel
Ankita Rao reports on a revolutionary palliative care program in Kerala, India, that has successfully addressed one of the world's most difficult health challenges.
January 13, 2016 / Nautilus
Lisa Palmer
How India's farmers try to step a step ahead of a changing climate.
January 13, 2016 / Marie Claire
Jason Motlagh
Jason Motlagh reports on Nigerian women who have been kidnapped by Boko Haram.
January 12, 2016 / The New Yorker
Luke Mogelson, Moises Saman
On the border of ISIS territory, Iraqi civilians fight for their survival.
January 12, 2016 / Untold Stories
Tracey Eaton
The renewal of diplomatic ties with the U.S. was a victory for Cuba, but the socialist government faces a challenging future as President Raul Castro reaches his twilight years, Cristina Escobar says...
Garissa University Principal Ahmed Osman Warfa has overseen the university through its opening, the Al Shabab attack that killed 148 people on campus last year, and now its reopening after being shuttered for 10 months. He calls the university a "lifeline" for the marginalized region. Image by Will Swanson. Kenya, 2015.
January 11, 2016 / Christian Science Monitor
Ariel Zirulnick, Will Swanson
Garissa University was intended to bring opportunity to long-marginalized northern Kenya when it opened in 2011. Its reopening after Al Shabab's 2015 attack provides a second chance to get it right.

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