April 18, 2014 / The Washington Post
Jason Motlagh
A year after the collapse of the Rana Plaza complex, safety measures and working conditions for garment factory workers have gotten better, but there is still a long way to go.
April 18, 2014 / Virginia Quarterly Review
Jason Motlagh
In Bangladesh, one year after the worst accident in the history of the garment industry, recovery remains a fragile process, justice seems elusive, and reform has a long way to go.
April 18, 2014 / The New Republic
Tomaso Clavarino
In Rwanda, tens of thousands of amputees serve as living reminders of the 1994 genocide.
April 1, 2014 / Untold Stories
Stuart Reid, Kenny Katombe
For decades, the Banyamulenge people of eastern Congo have found themselves foreigners in their own country. In January 2014, they met with Russ Feingold, the U.S. special envoy to the region.
April 1, 2014 / truthAtlas
Kem Knapp Sawyer, Jon Sawyer
Street kids are used to living from lie to lie—often penniless, some are orphans and others shunned as witches. In Kinshasa many seek refuge at ORPER where every child is considered "a jewel."
March 31, 2014 / Foreign Policy
Jeffrey E. Stern
What Afghanistan's election monitors pack for the most pivotal—and dangerous—political contest since 2001.
March 31, 2014
Tom Hundley
Drone warfare—cheap, easy and deadly—is likely to write the next chapter of the Arab-Israeli conflict.
March 31, 2014 / The New York Times
Michael Edison Hayden, Sami Siva
Providing adequate healthcare to India's massive and predominantly poor population is a daunting challenge.
March 29, 2014 / Foreign Policy
Jenna Krajeski
Turkey's hard-headed prime minister bans YouTube, as a divided country votes on his increasingly autocratic rule.
March 28, 2014 / The Atlantic
Jeffrey E. Stern
What does an airport say about a country? More than you might think.
March 28, 2014 / Al Jazeera
Jenna Krajeski
The blue-collar neighborhood of Kasimpasa in Istanbul has defined the prime minister's no-nonsense character.
March 28, 2014 / Roads & Kingdoms
Jenna Krajeski
After Turkey's massive Gezi protests, LGBT activists take the fight to the political arena.
March 27, 2014 / The New Republic
Jeffrey E. Stern
The former Johns Hopkins professor could be Afghanistan's next president. And he's willing to do whatever it takes—including selecting a brutal warlord as a running mate.

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