April 15, 2014 / The Atlantic
Dimiter Kenarov, Boryana Katsarova
Guliver’s Travels: Preserving history in Putin’s Crimea. One man's quest to honor the once-mighty Muslim Tatar state.
April 14, 2014 / Al Monitor
Caryle Murphy
Although Saudis welcomed the elevation of Prince Muqrin, 68, many wonder whether a younger, more energetic leadership might be better equipped to handle future economic and development challenges.
April 14, 2014 /
Tom Hundley
It has been nearly a year since the collapse of the Rana Plaza garment factory in Bangladesh left more than 1,100 workers dead.
April 3, 2014 / Untold Stories
Andre Lambertson, Kwame Dawes
Journalist Kwame Dawes explores the shame culture that isolates homosexuals and persons with HIV/AIDS in Jamaica.
April 3, 2014 / The New York Times
Michael Edison Hayden, Sami Siva
Despite a lack of success in providing adequate healthcare for the poor, Gujarat plans to expand its state health insurance program.
April 2, 2014 / Untold Stories
Allyn Gaestel, Allison Shelley
Only 10 percent of married women in Nigeria use contraception, and almost a third face unwanted pregnancy.
April 2, 2014 / The New York Times
Michael Edison Hayden, Sami Siva
The stigma attached to AIDS patients leads to discrimination in India's state-run hospitals.
April 1, 2014 / SportWeek
Tomaso Clavarino
Competitive sports helped erase the bloody past between Rwanda's Hutu and Tutsi.
April 1, 2014 / The New York Times
Caryle Murphy
Saudi Arabia is in the throes of far-reaching transformation. Will it destroy a partnership with the United States?
April 1, 2014 / The New York Times
Michael Edison Hayden, Sami Siva
Poor rural healthcare contributes to high infant mortality rates in India's urban hospitals.
April 1, 2014 / Untold Stories
Stuart Reid, Kenny Katombe
For decades, the Banyamulenge people of eastern Congo have found themselves foreigners in their own country. In January 2014, they met with Russ Feingold, the U.S. special envoy to the region.
April 1, 2014 / truthAtlas
Kem Knapp Sawyer, Jon Sawyer
Street kids are used to living from lie to lie—often penniless, some are orphans and others shunned as witches. In Kinshasa many seek refuge at ORPER where every child is considered "a jewel."
March 31, 2014 / Foreign Policy
Jeffrey E. Stern
What Afghanistan's election monitors pack for the most pivotal—and dangerous—political contest since 2001.

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