February 12, 2016 / PRI's The World
Rhitu Chatterjee
Childhood obesity is on the rise in Brazil. But thousands of school gardens around the country are trying to change children's eating habits by helping to build a connection to fresh food.
February 11, 2016 / Rappler
Ana P. Santos
Studies show that more young people than ever before are sexually active, but without proper sexual reproductive health information and access to contraception, they are left in the dark.
February 10, 2016 / PRI's The World
Rhitu Chatterjee
A 2009 law requires Brazilian cities to buy at least 30 percent of ingredients for meals in public schools from family farmers. The law has helped poor farmers and improved the quality of meals.
February 10, 2016 / Untold Stories
Rhitu Chatterjee
Brazil’s school feeding program is considered one of the best in the world. Journalist Rhitu Chatterjee was prepared to be impressed, but she didn't expect such high quality and care.
February 10, 2016 / Untold Stories
Rhitu Chatterjee
Soda or fresh fruit? Brazil's school feeding program began as a way to reduce hunger and malnutrition. But today, the program helps tackle obesity by encouraging children to "eat healthy."
February 10, 2016 / Untold Stories
Rhitu Chatterjee
Brazil is a global agricultural powerhouse, exporting products like coffee, cane sugar, orange juice and beef. But 70 percent of what Brazilians eat is grown by small family farmers.
February 9, 2016 / Health Affairs
Carina Storrs
The rotavirus vaccine is now included in routine immunization in many countries around the world. But can researchers find ways to boost its performance to save more lives in low-income countries?
February 8, 2016
Elana Dure, Katherine Zoepf, Jon Sawyer, kem knapp sawyer
Pulitzer Center grantee Katherine Zoepf, executive director Jon Sawyer and contributing editor Kem Knapp Sawyer visit Northwestern University in Qatar.
February 8, 2016
Elana Dure, Amanda Ottaway, Jin Ding, Daniella Zalcman
Students from the Inspired Teaching School present their blended photos at the Pulitzer Center.
February 8, 2016 / The Atlantic
Stuart A. Reid
Authoritarian leaders like the Gambia's Yahya Jammeh seem to relish the West's wealth. Why doesn’t the United States use that against them?
February 5, 2016 / The Atlantic
Stuart A. Reid
What happened when 11 exiles armed themselves for a violent night in the Gambia.
February 4, 2016 / Untold Stories
Robert Chaney
Animal impacts are more than just a traffic matter. They can be a matter of species survival.
February 4, 2016 / Untold Stories
Fiona Lloyd-Davies
Filmmaker Fiona Lloyd-Davies remembers Masika, a survivor of multiple rapes, who helped thousands of others in the DRC, where rape was used as a weapon of war.

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